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      The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Myelofibrosis and Related Neoplasms

      1 , 2 , * , 1

      Mediators of Inflammation

      Hindawi Publishing Corporation

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          Abstract

          Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in a wide variety of disorders ranging between traumatic, infectious, inflammatory, and malignant diseases. ROS are involved in inflammation-induced oxidative damage to cellular components including regulatory proteins and DNA. Furthermore, ROS have a major role in carcinogenesis and disease progression in the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), where the malignant clone itself produces excess of ROS thereby creating a vicious self-perpetuating circle in which ROS activate proinflammatory pathways (NF- κB) which in turn create more ROS. Targeting ROS may be a therapeutic option, which could possibly prevent genomic instability and ultimately myelofibrotic and leukemic transformation. In regard to the potent efficacy of the ROS-scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in decreasing ROS levels, it is intriguing to consider if NAC treatment might benefit patients with MPN. The encouraging results from studies in cystic fibrosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease warrant such studies. In addition, the antioxidative potential of the widely used agents, interferon-alpha2, statins, and JAK inhibitors, should be investigated as well. A combinatorial approach using old agents with anticancer properties together with novel JAK1/2 inhibitors may open a new era for patients with MPNs, the outlook not only being “minimal residual disease” and potential cure but also a marked improvement in inflammation-mediated comorbidities.

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          Most cited references 138

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          NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later.

          The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a major role in coordinating innate and adaptative immunity, cellular proliferation, apoptosis and development. Since the discovery in 1991 that NF-kappaB may be activated by H(2)O(2), several laboratories have put a considerable effort into dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying this activation. Whereas early studies revealed an atypical mechanism of activation, leading to IkappaBalpha Y42 phosphorylation independently of IkappaB kinase (IKK), recent findings suggest that H(2)O(2) activates NF-kappaB mainly through the classical IKK-dependent pathway. The molecular mechanisms leading to IKK activation are, however, cell-type specific and will be presented here. In this review, we also describe the effect of other ROS (HOCl and (1)O(2)) and reactive nitrogen species on NF-kappaB activation. Finally, we critically review the recent data highlighting the role of ROS in NF-kappaB activation by proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), two major components of innate immunity.
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            Mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone induces apoptosis through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

            Inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I by rotenone had been found to induce cell death in a variety of cells. However, the mechanism is still elusive. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in apoptosis and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I by rotenone was thought to be able to elevate mitochondrial ROS production, we investigated the relationship between rotenone-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Rotenone was able to induce mitochondrial complex I substrate-supported mitochondrial ROS production both in isolated mitochondria from HL-60 cells as well as in cultured cells. Rotenone-induced apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, cytochrome c release, and caspase 3 activity. A quantitative correlation between rotenone-induced apoptosis and rotenone-induced mitochondrial ROS production was identified. Rotenone-induced apoptosis was inhibited by treatment with antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetylcysteine, and vitamin C). The role of rotenone-induced mitochondrial ROS in apoptosis was also confirmed by the finding that HT1080 cells overexpressing magnesium superoxide dismutase were more resistant to rotenone-induced apoptosis than control cells. These results suggest that rotenone is able to induce apoptosis via enhancing the amount of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.
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              Reactive oxygen species: role in the development of cancer and various chronic conditions

              Oxygen derived species such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are well known to be cytotoxic and have been implicated in the etiology of a wide array of human diseases, including cancer. Various carcinogens may also partly exert their effect by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their metabolism. Oxidative damage to cellular DNA can lead to mutations and may, therefore, play an important role in the initiation and progression of multistage carcinogenesis. The changes in DNA such as base modification, rearrangement of DNA sequence, miscoding of DNA lesion, gene duplication and the activation of oncogenes may be involved in the initiation of various cancers. Elevated levels of ROS and down regulation of ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes are associated with various human diseases including various cancers. ROS are also implicated in diabtes and neurodegenerative diseases. ROS influences central cellular processes such as proliferation a, apoptosis, senescence which are implicated in the development of cancer. Understanding the role of ROS as key mediators in signaling cascades may provide various opportunities for pharmacological intervention.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Mediators Inflamm
                Mediators Inflamm
                MI
                Mediators of Inflammation
                Hindawi Publishing Corporation
                0962-9351
                1466-1861
                2015
                11 October 2015
                : 2015
                Affiliations
                1Department of Hematology, Roskilde Hospital, Køgevej 7-13, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
                2Institute for Inflammation Research, Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
                Author notes
                *Mads Emil Bjørn: meb@ 123456c.dk

                Academic Editor: Pham My-Chan Dang

                Article
                10.1155/2015/648090
                4619981
                Copyright © 2015 M. E. Bjørn and H. C. Hasselbalch.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Review Article

                Immunology

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