Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Update on lichen planus and its clinical variants

      , MSIII a , * , , MD, MBA b

      International Journal of Women's Dermatology

      Elsevier

      lichen, planus, lichenoid, LP, planopilaris, variants

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Lichen planus (LP) is an inflammatory skin condition with characteristic clinical and histopathological findings. Classic LP typically presents as pruritic, polygonal, violaceous flat-topped papules and plaques; many variants in morphology and location also exist, including oral, nail, linear, annular, atrophic, hypertrophic, inverse, eruptive, bullous, ulcerative, lichen planus pigmentosus, lichen planopilaris, vulvovaginal, actinic, lichen planus-lupus erythematosus overlap syndrome, and lichen planus pemphigoides. Clinical presentation of the rarer variant lesions may be largely dissimilar to classic LP and therefore difficult to diagnose based solely on clinical examination. However, histopathological examination of LP and LP-variant lesions reveal similar features, aiding in the proper diagnosis of the disease. Management of LP and LP variants aims to control symptoms and to decrease time from onset to resolution; it often involves topical corticosteroids, but varies depending on the severity and location of the lesion. The literature contains an array of reports on the variations in presentation and successful management of LP and its variants. A familiarity with LP and its variants is important in achieving timely recognition and management of the disease.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 86

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Pathophysiology, etiologic factors, and clinical management of oral lichen planus, part I: facts and controversies.

          Lichen planus (LP) is an inflammatory disease of the stratified squamous epithelia of unknown etiology. LP affects most frequently the oral mucosa, but it may also involve other mucosa and the skin. Oral LP (OLP) most frequently affects woman aged between 30 and 60 years. Histopathologic examination typically shows orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, basal cell degeneration, and a dense well-defined infiltrate of lymphocytes in the superficial dermis. OLP lesions may result from the induction of keratinocytes apoptosis by cytotoxic CD8+ T cells stimulated by a yet unidentified self-antigen on a genetically predisposed patient. The association of OLP with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been more consistently demonstrated in the Mediterranean area. Although HCV RNA and HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been retrieved in the mucosal lesions of patients with chronic HCV infection and OLP, the eventual pathophysiology of HCV in OLP lesions remains unclear. Available treatments of OLP are not curative, and many have potentially prominent side effects. The objectives of OLP management should be to prevent and screen for malignant transformation and alleviate symptoms on the long-term. Avoidance of potential precipitating drugs, tobacco, alcohol, and local trauma, as well as strict oral hygiene, is essential. The first-line pharmacologic treatment relies on topical steroids. Systemic steroids should be limited to the short-term cure of severe refractory OLP. Life-long clinical follow-up, at least annually, is fundamental. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Frontal fibrosing alopecia: a clinical review of 36 patients.

            Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a primary lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia with a distinctive clinical pattern of progressive frontotemporal hairline recession. Currently, there are no evidence-based studies to guide treatment for patients with FFA; thus, treatment options vary among clinicians.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Pemphigoid diseases: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.

              Pemphigoid diseases (including bullous pemphigoid, mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigoid gestationis, linear IgA dermatosis, lichen planus pemphigoides, and anti-p200 pemphigoid) are a subgroup of autoimmune bullous skin diseases characterized by an autoantibody response toward structural components of the hemidesmosome resulting in subepidermal blistering. By the use of different in vitro systems and experimental animal models, the pathogenic relevance of these autoantibodies has been demonstrated. Recent advances in the understanding of autoantibody responses have led to novel diagnostic tools and a more differentiated therapeutic approach for these disorders. This review covers the most recent understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this group of autoimmune diseases.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Int J Womens Dermatol
                Int J Womens Dermatol
                International Journal of Women's Dermatology
                Elsevier
                2352-6475
                16 September 2015
                August 2015
                16 September 2015
                : 1
                : 3
                : 140-149
                Affiliations
                [a ]University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT
                [b ]Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. gweston@ 123456uchc.edu
                Article
                S2352-6475(15)00030-1
                10.1016/j.ijwd.2015.04.001
                5418875
                © 2015 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                variants, planopilaris, lp, lichenoid, planus, lichen

                Comments

                Comment on this article