45
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Ionospheric effects during first 2 hours after the Chelyabinsk meteorite impact

      Preprint

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This paper presents the analysis of ionospheric effects in the region close to the Chelyabinsk meteorite explosion at 03:20UT 2013 February 15 from the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (ISTP SB RAS) EKB radar data, and from the Institute of Geophysics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (IG UB RAS) PARUS ionosonde data. Both instruments are located within the IG UB RAS Arti Observatory approximately 200 km northward from the estimated explosion site. According to the data obtained, the ionospheric disturbance caused by the meteorite flyby, explosion, and impact had high dynamics and amplitude. However, it obviously did not lead to a variation in the ionosphere mean parameters in the region above the disturbance center during the first 2 hours. Essential effects, however, were observed at more than 100-200 km from the explosion site and farther up to 1500 km.

          Related collections

          Most cited references6

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The shock-acoustic waves generated by earthquakes

          , , (2001)
          We investigate the form and dynamics of shock-acoustic waves generated by earthquakes. We use the method for detecting and locating the sources of ionospheric impulsive disturbances, based on using data from a global network of receivers of the GPS navigation system and requiring no a priori information about the place and time of associated effects. The practical implementation of the method is illustrated by a case study of earthquake effects in Turkey (August 17, and November 12, 1999), in Southern Sumatera (June 4, 2000), and off the coast of Central America (January 13, 2001). It was found that in all instances the time period of the ionospheric response is 180-390 s, and the amplitude exceeds by a factor of two as a minimum the standard deviation of background fluctuations in total electron content in this range of periods under quiet and moderate geomagnetic conditions. The elevation of the wave vector varies through a range of 20-44 degree, and the phase velocity (1100-1300 m/s) approaches the sound velocity at the heights of the ionospheric F-region maximum. The calculated (by neglecting refraction corrections) location of the source roughly corresponds to the earthquake epicenter. Our data are consistent with the present views that shock-acoustic waves are caused by a piston-like movement of the Earth surface in the zone of an earthquake epicenter.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Aerosol plume after the Chelyabinsk bolide

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The synthesis of travelling ionospheric disturbance (TID) signatures in HF radar observations using ray tracing

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                2013-08-18
                Article
                1308.3918
                4db1ce97-f10f-447b-84d2-705e49fcd3b9

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                History
                Custom metadata
                Solar-Terrestrial physics, 24, 3-14, 2013 (in russian)
                30 pages, 15 figures, submitted to JASTP
                physics.geo-ph physics.space-ph

                Geophysics,Space Physics
                Geophysics, Space Physics

                Comments

                Comment on this article