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      The reader-oriented scholarly edition

      Digital Scholarship in the Humanities

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          Recent attempts to computer-model the scholarly edition so as to permit the crowd-sourcing of its production have misunderstood its nature. Scholarly editions are, in their methodology and form, not unchanging, nor are their underlying conceptions simple. This essay is, in response, a reflection on the opportunities that the digital form potentially offers editors about how they may gain traction by taking advantage of the capacities and logic of the new medium. The main proposal stems from leaving the representational question on hold (how the edition represents the work and the methodologies used to achieve that) and instead considering the edition primarily as a transaction with its readers—those print-counterparts of the digital crowd. The history of post-war scholarly editions is reviewed for its evolving understandings of the reader-user. Then a conceptual separation between the archive and the edition is proposed so that a new, more reader-oriented definition of editorial responsibilities can be envisaged for digital scholarly editions—something that the logic of the print medium forbade.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Toward modeling the social edition: An approach to understanding the electronic scholarly edition in the context of new and emerging social media

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            Text-encoding, Theories of the Text, and the ‘Work-Site’11 The thinking in this study has been stimulated by countless conversations with my collaborators in the successive Just In Time Markup (JITM) projects at the Australian Scholarly Editions Centre, Phill Berrie (the programmer), Graham Barwell (University of Wollongong), and Chris Tiffin (University of Queensland); and by, if anything, even more conversations on editorial theory and textual computing with Peter Shillingsburg and, to a lesser extent, with Peter Robinson (both, De Montfort University, Leicester), who generously allowed me to read unpublished work of theirs.

             Paul Eggert (2005)
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              An Inquiry into "Ulysses The Corrected Text"

               JOHN KIDD (1988)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Digital Scholarship in the Humanities
                Digital Scholarship Humanities
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                2055-7671
                2055-768X
                December 28 2016
                December 29 2016
                : 31
                : 4
                : 797-810
                Article
                10.1093/llc/fqw043
                © 2016

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