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      Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin Decoction ameliorated the osteoporotic phenotype of ovariectomized mice without affecting the serum estrogen concentration or uterus

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          Abstract

          Introduction

          Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin Decoction (BSNXD), a traditional Chinese medicinal composition, has been used as a remedy for postmenopausal osteoporosis, but its effects on bone metabolism and the uterus have not been reported.

          Purpose

          We aimed to determine the respective effects of BSNXD on the bones and the uterus of ovariectomized (OVX) mice to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this herbal formula.

          Materials and methods

          Postmenopausal osteoporosis animal models that were generated by ovariectomy were treated with BSNXD. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed to analyze the bone mineral density, and histomorphometric analysis was performed to measure the parameters related to bone metabolism. Calcein labeling was performed to detect bone formation. The uteruses from the mice were weighed, and the histomorphometry was analyzed. Drug-derived serum was prepared to assess the 17-β-estradiol concentration via enzyme immunoassay.

          Results

          BSNXD administration ameliorated the osteoporotic phenotype of OVX mice, as evidenced by an increase in the bone mineral density and bone volume; these effects could not be abolished by the administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. Moreover, BSNXD had no effect on the serum estrogen concentration or uterus.

          Conclusion

          These results suggest that BSNXD has ameliorating effects on bone loss due to estrogen deprivation without affecting the peripheral blood estrogen concentration or the uterus in OVX mice.

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          Most cited references 37

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          Bone histomorphometry: standardization of nomenclature, symbols, and units. Report of the ASBMR Histomorphometry Nomenclature Committee.

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            From traditional Chinese medicine to rational cancer therapy.

            Many natural products and derivatives thereof belong to the standard repertoire of cancer chemotherapy. Examples are Vinca alkaloids, taxanes and camptothecins. In recent years, the potential of natural products from plants, notably from medicinal plants used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been recognized by the scientific community in the Western world. To provide an example of the most recent developments in this field, we have selected several compounds, namely artesunate, homoharringtonine, arsenic trioxide and cantharidin, that are found in natural TCM products and that have the potential for use in cancer therapy. Controlled clinical studies have shown that homoharringtonine and arsenic trioxide can exert profound activity against leukaemia. Increased knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of TCM-derived drugs and recent developments in their applications demonstrate that the combination of TCM with modern cutting-edge technologies provides an attractive strategy for the development of novel and improved cancer therapeutics.
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              Increased osteoclast development after estrogen loss: mediation by interleukin-6.

              Osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, develop from hematopoietic precursors of the bone marrow under the control of factors produced in their microenvironment. The cytokine interleukin-6 can promote hematopoiesis and osteoclastogenesis. Interleukin-6 production by bone and marrow stromal cells is suppressed by 17 beta-estradiol in vitro. In mice, estrogen loss (ovariectomy) increased the number of colony-forming units for granulocytes and macrophages, enhanced osteoclast development in ex vivo cultures of marrow, and increased the number of osteoclasts in trabecular bone. These changes were prevented by 17 beta-estradiol or an antibody to interleukin-6. Thus, estrogen loss results in an interleukin-6-mediated stimulation of osteoclastogenesis, which suggests a mechanism for the increased bone resorption in postmenopausal osteoporosis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2015
                31 August 2015
                : 9
                : 5019-5031
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Laboratory for Reproductive Immunology, Hospital and Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IBS, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
                [3 ]Department of Pharmacy, Wagner Jauregg Hospital and Children’s Hospital, Linz, Austria
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Da-Jin Li, Laboratory for Reproductive Immunology, Hospital & Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IBS, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai 200011, People’s Republic of China, Tel +86 21 6345 7331, Email djli@ 123456shmu.edu.cn
                [*]

                These authors contributed equally to this work

                Article
                dddt-9-5019
                10.2147/DDDT.S89505
                4560509
                26357466
                © 2015 Wang et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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