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      Analyzing data citation practices using the Data Citation Index

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          Abstract

          We present an analysis of data citation practices based on the Data Citation Index from Thomson Reuters. This database launched in 2012 aims to link data sets and data studies with citations received from the other citation indexes. The DCI harvests citations to research data from papers indexed in the Web of Science. It relies on the information provided by the data repository as data citation practices are inconsistent or inexistent in many cases. The findings of this study show that data citation practices are far from common in most research fields. Some differences have been reported on the way researchers cite data: while in the areas of Science and Engineering and Technology data sets were the most cited, in Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities data studies play a greater role. A total of 88.1 percent of the records have received no citation, but some repositories show very low uncitedness rates. Although data citation practices are rare in most fields, they have expanded in disciplines such as crystallography and genomics. We conclude by emphasizing the role that the DCI could play in encouraging the consistent, standardized citation of research data; a role that would enhance their value as a means of following the research process from data collection to publication.

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          If We Share Data, Will Anyone Use Them? Data Sharing and Reuse in the Long Tail of Science and Technology

          Research on practices to share and reuse data will inform the design of infrastructure to support data collection, management, and discovery in the long tail of science and technology. These are research domains in which data tend to be local in character, minimally structured, and minimally documented. We report on a ten-year study of the Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. We found that CENS researchers are willing to share their data, but few are asked to do so, and in only a few domain areas do their funders or journals require them to deposit data. Few repositories exist to accept data in CENS research areas.. Data sharing tends to occur only through interpersonal exchanges. CENS researchers obtain data from repositories, and occasionally from registries and individuals, to provide context, calibration, or other forms of background for their studies. Neither CENS researchers nor those who request access to CENS data appear to use external data for primary research questions or for replication of studies. CENS researchers are willing to share data if they receive credit and retain first rights to publish their results. Practices of releasing, sharing, and reusing of data in CENS reaffirm the gift culture of scholarship, in which goods are bartered between trusted colleagues rather than treated as commodities.
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            Citation indexing for studying science.

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              "Science Citation Index"--A New Dimension in Indexing.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2015-01-26
                2015-05-19
                Article
                1501.06285
                4e981b88-2b49-4154-911d-f719ca88628e

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                History
                Custom metadata
                Paper accepted for publication in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology. v2 revises style on text, title and abstract
                cs.DL

                Information & Library science
                Information & Library science

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