4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Biological attributes of diapausing and non-diapausing Doryctobracon areolatus (Hymenoptera, Braconidae), a parasitoid of Anastrepha spp. (Diptera, Tephritidae) fruit flies

      , , , ,

      Journal of Hymenoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti), a solitary endoparasitoid native to the Neotropics, attacks eggs and early instar larvae of Anastrepha fruit flies, and can enter diapause under tropical and subtropical conditions. We aimed to test if biological attributes, such as size, flight ability, starvation resistance, longevity and fecundity of diapausing individuals differ from those of non-diapausing ones. Parasitoids were obtained from a laboratory colony reared on Anastrepha ludens (Loew) larvae. Parasitized host puparia were sorted in two cohorts according to their diapause condition. Developmental time from egg to adult ranged from 18 to 31 days in non-diapausing parasitoids, and 70 to 278 days for diapausing individuals. Pupal weight and adult measurements were higher in non-diapausing than in diapausing parasitoids. There were no differences in adult longevity, starvation resistance, and emergence between diapausing and non-diapausing wasps. Flight ability and fecundity rates were greater in the non-diapausing than in the diapause cohort. The proportion of female offspring was greater in the non-diapausing cohort (42.5%), whereas in the diapausing cohort the male offspring proportion was greater (62.4%). Both cohorts produced diapause offspring, but the non-diapausing cohort produced more (26.6%) than the diapausing one (9.1%). Maternal age had a significant effect on the proportion of diapause offspring: in 26 to 34 days old non-diapausing females, 78.9% of their offspring entered into diapause. These results confirmed that diapause affects the biological attributes of D. areolatus. The observed differences contribute to better understand the diapause influence on the colonization and rearing process of this species and its use as biocontrol agent.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Meeting the energetic demands of insect diapause: nutrient storage and utilization.

          Insects in diapause characteristically feed very little or not at all, thus they are largely or totally dependent on energy reserves sequestered prior to the entry into diapause. Fats are the dominant reserve used during this period, but non-fat reserves are also important for some species, especially during certain phases of diapause. Metabolic depression, coupled with the low temperatures of winter, facilitates the economic utilization of reserves during the many months typical of most diapauses. Though many insects store additional lipid prior to the entry into diapause, our review of the literature indicates that this is not always the case. We provide evidence that interactions between nutrient storage and metabolism can influence the decision to enter diapause and determine how long to remain in diapause. In addition, the energy reserves expended during diapause have a profound effect on post-diapause fitness. Though the physiological and biochemical mechanisms that regulate nutrient homeostasis prior to and during diapause remain poorly known, we propose several mechanisms that have the potential to contribute to diapause-associated nutrient homeostasis. Potential players include insulin signaling, neuropeptide F, cGMP-kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase, and adipokinetic hormone.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            TheRCommander: A Basic-Statistics Graphical User Interface toR

             John Fox (2005)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Dormancy in tropical insects.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Journal of Hymenoptera Research
                JHR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2607
                1070-9428
                August 31 2020
                August 31 2020
                : 78
                : 41-56
                Article
                10.3897/jhr.78.52269
                © 2020

                Comments

                Comment on this article