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      Noise-induced vocal plasticity in urban white-crowned sparrows does not involve adjustment of trill performance components

      , 1 , 2 , 1

      Scientific Reports

      Nature Publishing Group UK

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          Abstract

          Background noise can interfere with acoustic communication and subsequently influence signaling behavior. Immediate signaling flexibility (ISF) is a context-dependent form of behavioral plasticity that allows animals to temporarily change their acoustic behavior in response to noise fluctuations and potentially improve the chances of successful communication in noisy environments. The adaptive value of ISF is ultimately contingent on the response of the intended receiver, and there are differential effects on receiver response depending on which signal component is modified. However, there is scant research on whether ISF involves modification of a signal component specifically linked to mate attraction or territory defense. Our study addresses this knowledge gap and provides important insight into whether males employ short-term signal modification in a manner that could affect mate pairing success in birds. Specifically, we explore the maladaptive potential of ISF in the San Francisco, California population of Zonotrichia leucophrys nuttalli by testing for changes in trill bandwidth and rate—the specific trill structure components known to influence the receiver’s perception of vocal performance in this species—before and during noise broadcast experiments. Although Zonotrichia leucophrys nuttalli are capable of ISF, we found no evidence that noise induces temporary adjustment of the trill structure traits used by receivers to assess vocal performance.

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          Most cited references 51

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          AVIAN COMMUNICATION IN URBAN NOISE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF VOCAL ADJUSTMENT

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            A framework for understanding noise impacts on wildlife: an urgent conservation priority

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              Songs of the city: noise-dependent spectral plasticity in the acoustic phenotype of urban birds

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                gentry.ke@gmail.com
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                13 February 2019
                13 February 2019
                2019
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8032, GRID grid.22448.38, George Mason University Biology Department, ; 4400 University Dr., Fairfax, 22030 USA
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1937 2197, GRID grid.169077.e, Present Address: Purdue University Department of Biological Sciences, Lilly Hall of Life Science, ; 915W. State St., West Lafayette, IN 47906 USA
                Article
                36276
                10.1038/s41598-018-36276-5
                6374513
                30760726
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100000001, National Science Foundation (NSF);
                Award ID: 1354763
                Award ID: 1354756
                Award ID: 1354763
                Award ID: 1354756
                Award Recipient :
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