23
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Asymptomatic Coarctation of the Aorta in a Middle-Aged Man; The Significance of Physical Examination

      ,
      Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
      Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Diagnosis, imaging and clinical management of aortic coarctation.

          Coarctation of the aorta (CoA ) is a well-known congenital heart disease (CHD) , which is often associated with several other cardiac and vascular anomalies, such as bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus and aortic arch hypoplasia. Despite echocardiographic screening, prenatal diagnosis of C o A remains difficult. Most patients with CoA present in infancy with absent, delayed or reduced femoral pulses, a supine arm-leg blood pressure gradient (> 20 mm Hg), or a murmur due to rapid blood flow across the CoA or associated lesions (BAV). Transthoracic echocardiography is the primary imaging modality for suspected CoA. However, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred advanced imaging modality for non-invasive diagnosis and follow-up of CoA. Adequate and timely diagnosis of CoA is crucial for good prognosis, as early treatment is associated with lower risks of long-term morbidity and mortality. Numerous surgical and transcatheter treatment strategies have been reported for CoA. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice in neonates, infants and young children. In older children (> 25 kg) and adults, transcatheter treatment is the treatment of choice. In the current era, patients with CoA continue to have a reduced life expectancy and an increased risk of cardiovascular sequelae later in life, despite adequate relief of the aortic stenosis. Intensive and adequate follow-up of the left ventricular function, valvular function, blood pressure and the anatomy of the heart and the aorta are , therefore, critical in the management of CoA. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art clinical diagnosis, diagnostic imaging algori thms, treatment and follow-up of patients with CoA.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Coarctation of the aorta: natural history and outcome after surgical treatment.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence and long-term predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy, late hypertension, and hypertensive response to exercise after successful aortic coarctation repair.

              Controversial data exist about the long-term results of aortic coarctation (AC) repair. This study explored the prevalence and predictors of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, late hypertension, and hypertensive response to exercise in 48 subjects (age, 15.1 ± 9.7 years) currently followed in the authors' tertiary care hospital after successful AC repair. Data on medical history, clinical examination, rest and exercise echocardiography, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were collected. The time from AC repair to follow-up evaluation was 12.9 ± 9.2 years. The prevalence of LV hypertrophy ranged from 23 to 38 %, based on the criteria used to identify LV hypertrophy, and that of concentric geometry was 17 %. One sixth of the patients without residual hypertension experienced late-onset hypertension. One fourth of those who remained normotensive without medication showed a hypertensive response to exercise. Age at AC repair was the strongest independent predictor of LV hypertrophy, defined using indexation either for body surface area (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; p = 0.0090) or for height(2.7) (OR 1.02; p = 0.029), and it was the only predictor of late hypertension (OR 1.06; p = 0.0023) and hypertensive response to exercise (OR 1.09; p = 0.029). The risk of LV hypertrophy was 25 % for repair at the age of 3.4 years but rose to 50 and 75 % for repair at the ages of 5.9 and 8.4 years, respectively. Similar increases were found for the risk of late-onset hypertension and hypertensive response to exercise. A considerable risk of LV hypertrophy, late hypertension, and hypertensive response to exercise exists after successful AC repair. Older age at intervention is the most important predictor of these complications.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
                Can Journ Gen Int Med
                Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.
                2369-1778
                1911-1606
                March 05 2018
                March 05 2018
                : 13
                : 1
                Article
                10.22374/cjgim.v13i1.217
                4ec21bf7-f7d8-48fd-870b-cc512690e84a
                © 2018

                Copyright of articles published in all DPG titles is retained by the author. The author grants DPG the rights to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher. The author grants DPG exclusive commercial rights to the article. The author grants any non-commercial third party the rights to use the article freely provided original author(s) and citation details are cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/


                General medicine,Geriatric medicine,Neurology,Internal medicine
                General medicine, Geriatric medicine, Neurology, Internal medicine

                Comments

                Comment on this article