21
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      The influence of numbers on invasion success

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 4
      Molecular Ecology
      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The process by which a species becomes a biological invader, at a location where it does not naturally occur, can be divided into a series of sequential stages (transport, introduction, establishment and spread). A species' success at passing through each of these stages depends, in a large part, on the number of individuals available to assist making each transition. Here, we review the evidence that numbers determine success at each stage of the invasion process and then discuss the likely mechanisms by which numbers affect success. We conclude that numbers of individuals affect transport and introduction by moderating the likelihood that abundant (and widespread) species are deliberately or accidentally translocated; affect establishment success by moderating the stochastic processes (demographic, environmental, genetic or Allee) to which small, introduced populations will be vulnerable; and affect invasive spread most likely because of persistent genetic effects determined by the numbers of individuals involved in the establishment phase. We finish by suggesting some further steps to advance our understanding of the influence of numbers on invasion success, particularly as they relate to the genetics of the process.

          Related collections

          Most cited references82

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Book: found

          The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Directions in Conservation Biology

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A proposed unified framework for biological invasions.

              There has been a dramatic growth in research on biological invasions over the past 20 years, but a mature understanding of the field has been hampered because invasion biologists concerned with different taxa and different environments have largely adopted different model frameworks for the invasion process, resulting in a confusing range of concepts, terms and definitions. In this review, we propose a unified framework for biological invasions that reconciles and integrates the key features of the most commonly used invasion frameworks into a single conceptual model that can be applied to all human-mediated invasions. The unified framework combines previous stage-based and barrier models, and provides a terminology and categorisation for populations at different points in the invasion process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Molecular Ecology
                Mol Ecol
                Wiley
                09621083
                May 2015
                May 2015
                February 06 2015
                : 24
                : 9
                : 1942-1953
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment; Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research; University College London; Gower Street London WC1E 6BT UK
                [2 ]Institute of Zoology; ZSL; Regent's Park London NW1 4RY UK
                [3 ]Distinguished Scientist Fellowship Program; King Saud University; PO Box 2455 Riyadh 1145 Saudi Arabia
                [4 ]School of Biological Sciences; University of Adelaide; Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
                [5 ]Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources; Rutgers University; New Brunswick NJ 08901 USA
                Article
                10.1111/mec.13075
                25641210
                4eca284a-54e6-46b8-ba76-97bb52e084f0
                © 2015

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article