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      DNA-capped Fe3O4/SiO2 magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for potential controlled drug release and hyperthermia

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 2 , 3 , 4

      RSC Advances

      Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)

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          Abstract

          DNA-capped Fe 3O 4/SiO 2 magnetic mesoporous silica (MMS) nanoparticles were developed for potential temperature controlled drug release and magnetic hyperthermia.

          Abstract

          We proposed a strategy to construct DNA-capped Fe 3O 4/SiO 2 magnetic mesoporous silica (MMS) nanoparticles for potential temperature controlled drug release and magnetic hyperthermia. Drug release behavior, magnetic heating capacity, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cell uptake of the MMS-based nanocarriers were evaluated. The results showed that the DOX/MMS–NH 2–dsDNA complexes could release DOX fast at 50 °C, but very slow at 37 °C. Also, MMS-based nanocarriers could efficiently generate heat upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field due to the superparamagnetic behavior. Furthermore, the MMS–NH 2–dsDNA complexes could be effectively taken up by murine breast cancer 4T1 cells, and negligible cytotoxicity of the MMS–NH 2–dsDNA complexes has been observed. Therefore, DNA-capped MMS nanoparticles had potential for cancer therapy with temperature controlled drug release and magnetic hyperthermia.

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          Most cited references 43

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          Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for controlled drug delivery.

          In the past decade, non-invasive and biocompatible mesoporous silica materials as efficient drug delivery systems have attracted special attention. Great progress in structure control and functionalization (magnetism and luminescence) design has been achieved for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent research progress on silica-based controlled drug delivery systems, including: (i) pure mesoporous silica sustained-release systems, (ii) magnetism and/or luminescence functionalized mesoporous silica systems which integrate targeting and tracking abilities of drug molecules, and (iii) stimuli-responsive controlled release systems which are able to respond to environmental changes, such as pH, redox potential, temperature, photoirradiation, and biomolecules. Although encouraging and potential developments have been achieved, design and mass production of novel multifunctional carriers, some practical biological application, such as biodistribution, the acute and chronic toxicities, long-term stability, circulation properties and targeting efficacy in vivo are still challenging. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012
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            Magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery.

            Previous attempts to review the literature on magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy focused primarily on magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using mono metallic/metal oxide nanoparticles. The term "hyperthermia" in the literature was also confined only to include use of heat for therapeutic applications. Recently, there have been a number of publications demonstrating magnetic nanoparticle-based hyperthermia to generate local heat resulting in the release of drugs either bound to the magnetic nanoparticle or encapsulated within polymeric matrices. In this review article, we present a case for broadening the meaning of the term "hyperthermia" by including thermotherapy as well as magnetically modulated controlled drug delivery. We provide a classification for controlled drug delivery using hyperthermia: Hyperthermia-based controlled drug delivery through bond breaking (DBB) and hyperthermia-based controlled drug delivery through enhanced permeability (DEP). The review also covers, for the first time, core-shell type magnetic nanomaterials, especially nanoshells prepared using layer-by-layer self-assembly, for the application of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery. The highlight of the review article is to portray potential opportunities for the combination of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug release paradigms--towards successful application in personalized medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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              What controls the melting properties of DNA-linked gold nanoparticle assemblies?

              We report a series of experiments and a theoretical model designed to systematically define and evaluate the relative importance of nanoparticle, oligonucleotide, and environmental variables that contribute to the observed sharp melting transitions associated with DNA-linked nanoparticle structures. These variables include the size of the nanoparticles, the surface density of the oligonucleotides on the nanoparticles, the dielectric constant of the surrounding medium, target concentration, and the position of the nanoparticles with respect to one another within the aggregate. The experimental data may be understood in terms of a thermodynamic model that attributes the sharp melting to a cooperative mechanism that results from two key factors: the presence of multiple DNA linkers between each pair of nanoparticles and a decrease in the melting temperature as DNA strands melt due to a concomitant reduction in local salt concentration. The cooperative melting effect, originating from short-range duplex-to-duplex interactions, is independent of DNA base sequences studied and should be universal for any type of nanostructured probe that is heavily functionalized with oligonucleotides. Understanding the fundamental origins of the melting properties of DNA-linked nanoparticle aggregates (or monolayers) is of paramount importance because these properties directly impact one's ability to formulate high sensitivity and selectivity DNA detection systems and construct materials from these novel nanoparticle materials.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                RSCACL
                RSC Advances
                RSC Adv.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                2046-2069
                2015
                2015
                : 5
                : 29
                : 22365-22372
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Materials Science and Engineering
                [2 ]University of Shanghai for Science and Technology
                [3 ]Shanghai
                [4 ]China
                [5 ]School of Medical Instrument and Food Engineering
                Article
                10.1039/C5RA00701A
                © 2015
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C5RA00701A

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