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      The Orphan Nuclear Receptor REV-ERBα Controls Circadian Transcription within the Positive Limb of the Mammalian Circadian Oscillator

      , , , , , ,

      Cell

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Mammalian circadian rhythms are generated by a feedback loop in which BMAL1 and CLOCK, players of the positive limb, activate transcription of the cryptochrome and period genes, components of the negative limb. Bmal1 and Per transcription cycles display nearly opposite phases and are thus governed by different mechanisms. Here, we identify the orphan nuclear receptor REV-ERBalpha as the major regulator of cyclic Bmal1 transcription. Circadian Rev-erbalpha expression is controlled by components of the general feedback loop. Thus, REV-ERBalpha constitutes a molecular link through which components of the negative limb drive antiphasic expression of components of the positive limb. While REV-ERBalpha influences the period length and affects the phase-shifting properties of the clock, it is not required for circadian rhythm generation.

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          Most cited references 28

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          Posttranslational mechanisms regulate the mammalian circadian clock.

          We have examined posttranslational regulation of clock proteins in mouse liver in vivo. The mouse PERIOD proteins (mPER1 and mPER2), CLOCK, and BMAL1 undergo robust circadian changes in phosphorylation. These proteins, the cryptochromes (mCRY1 and mCRY2), and casein kinase I epsilon (CKIepsilon) form multimeric complexes that are bound to DNA during negative transcriptional feedback. CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimers remain bound to DNA over the circadian cycle. The temporal increase in mPER abundance controls the negative feedback interactions. Analysis of clock proteins in mCRY-deficient mice shows that the mCRYs are necessary for stabilizing phosphorylated mPER2 and for the nuclear accumulation of mPER1, mPER2, and CKIepsilon. We also provide in vivo evidence that casein kinase I delta is a second clock relevant kinase.
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            Interacting molecular loops in the mammalian circadian clock.

            We show that, in the mouse, the core mechanism for the master circadian clock consists of interacting positive and negative transcription and translation feedback loops. Analysis of Clock/Clock mutant mice, homozygous Period2(Brdm1) mutants, and Cryptochrome-deficient mice reveals substantially altered Bmal1 rhythms, consistent with a dominant role of PERIOD2 in the positive regulation of the Bmal1 loop. In vitro analysis of CRYPTOCHROME inhibition of CLOCK: BMAL1-mediated transcription shows that the inhibition is through direct protein:protein interactions, independent of the PERIOD and TIMELESS proteins. PERIOD2 is a positive regulator of the Bmal1 loop, and CRYPTOCHROMES are the negative regulators of the Period and Cryptochrome cycles.
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              Differential functions of mPer1, mPer2, and mPer3 in the SCN circadian clock.

              The role of mPer1 and mPer2 in regulating circadian rhythms was assessed by disrupting these genes. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele of either mPer1 or mPer2 had severely disrupted locomotor activity rhythms during extended exposure to constant darkness. Clock gene RNA rhythms were blunted in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of mPer2 mutant mice, but not of mPER1-deficient mice. Peak mPER and mCRY1 protein levels were reduced in both lines. Behavioral rhythms of mPer1/mPer3 and mPer2/mPer3 double-mutant mice resembled rhythms of mice with disruption of mPer1 or mPer2 alone, respectively, confirming the placement of mPer3 outside the core circadian clockwork. In contrast, mPer1/mPer2 double-mutant mice were immediately arrhythmic. Thus, mPER1 influences rhythmicity primarily through interaction with other clock proteins, while mPER2 positively regulates rhythmic gene expression, and there is partial compensation between products of these two genes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cell
                Cell
                Elsevier BV
                00928674
                July 2002
                July 2002
                : 110
                : 2
                : 251-260
                Article
                10.1016/S0092-8674(02)00825-5
                12150932
                © 2002

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

                https://www.elsevier.com/open-access/userlicense/1.0/

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