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      Second malignancies in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: a population-based cohort study of 9379 patients

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          Abstract

          To determine the risk of a wide range of second malignancies in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), we conducted a large population-based study and compared the results to matched controls. From national Swedish registers, 9379 patients with MPNs diagnosed between 1973 and 2009, and 35,682 matched controls were identified as well as information on second malignancies, with follow-up until 2010. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression and a flexible parametric model. There was a significantly increased risk of any non-hematologic cancer with HR of 1.6 (95% CI: 1.5-1.7). The HRs for non-melanoma skin cancer was 2.8 (2.4-3.3), kidney cancer 2.8 (2.0-4.0), brain cancer 2.8 (1.9-4.2), endocrine cancers 2.5 (1.6-3.8), malignant melanoma 1.9 (1.4-2.7), pancreas cancer 1.8 (1.2-2.6), lung cancer 1.7 (1.4-2.2), and head and neck cancer 1.7 (1.2-2.6). The HR of second malignancies was similar across all MPN subtypes, sex, and calendar periods of MPN diagnosis. The risk of developing a hematologic malignancy was also significantly increased; the HR for acute myeloid leukemia was 46.0 (32.6-64.9) and for lymphoma 2.6 (2.0-3.3). In conclusion, our study provides robust population-based support of an increased cancer risk in MPN patients.

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          Most cited references24

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          Long-term survival and blast transformation in molecularly annotated essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis.

          Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutations define polycythemia vera (PV). Calreticulin (CALR) and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene (MPL) mutations are specific to JAK2-unmutated essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). We examined the effect of these mutations on long-term disease outcome. One thousand five hundred eighty-one patients from the Mayo Clinic (n = 826) and Italy (n = 755) were studied. Fifty-eight percent of Mayo patients were followed until death; median survivals were 19.8 years in ET (n = 292), 13.5 PV (n = 267; hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-2.2), and 5.9 PMF (n = 267; HR, 4.5; 95% CI, 3.5-5.7). The survival advantage of ET over PV was not affected by JAK2/CALR/MPL mutational status. Survival in ET was inferior to the age- and sex-matched US population (P < .001). In PMF (n = 428), but not in ET (n = 576), survival and blast transformation (BT) were significantly affected by mutational status; outcome was best in CALR-mutated and worst in triple-negative patients: median survival, 16 vs 2.3 years (HR, 5.1; 95% CI, 3.2-8.0) and BT, 6.5% vs 25% (HR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.8-20.2), respectively. We conclude that life expectancy in morphologically defined ET is significantly reduced but remains superior to that of PV, regardless of mutational status. In PMF, JAK2/CALR/MPL mutational status is prognostically informative.
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            Genetic basis and molecular pathophysiology of classical myeloproliferative neoplasms

            The genetic landscape of classical myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) is in large part elucidated. The MPN-restricted driver mutations, including those in JAK2, calreticulin (CALR), and myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL), abnormally activate the cytokine receptor/JAK2 pathway and their downstream effectors, more particularly the STATs. The most frequent mutation, JAK2V617F, activates the 3 main myeloid cytokine receptors (erythropoietin receptor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, and MPL) whereas CALR or MPL mutants are restricted to MPL activation. This explains why JAK2V617F is associated with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) whereas CALR and MPL mutants are found in ET and PMF. Other mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation, splicing, and signaling cooperate with the 3 MPN drivers and play a key role in the PMF pathogenesis. Mutations in epigenetic regulators TET2 and DNMT3A are involved in disease initiation and may precede the acquisition of JAK2V617F. Other mutations in epigenetic regulators such as EZH2 and ASXL1 also play a role in disease initiation and disease progression. Mutations in the splicing machinery are predominantly found in PMF and are implicated in the development of anemia or pancytopenia. Both heterogeneity of classical MPNs and prognosis are determined by a specific genomic landscape, that is, type of MPN driver mutations, association with other mutations, and their order of acquisition. However, factors other than somatic mutations play an important role in disease initiation as well as disease progression such as germ line predisposition, inflammation, and aging. Delineation of these environmental factors will be important to better understand the precise pathogenesis of MPN.
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              Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: critical concepts and management recommendations from European LeukemiaNet.

              We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according the criterion of clinical relevance. Statements were produced using a Delphi process, and two consensus conferences involving a panel of 21 experts appointed by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) were convened. Patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) should be defined as high risk if age is greater than 60 years or there is a history of previous thrombosis. Risk stratification in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) should start with the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) for newly diagnosed patients and dynamic IPSS for patients being seen during their disease course, with the addition of cytogenetics evaluation and transfusion status. High-risk patients with PV should be managed with phlebotomy, low-dose aspirin, and cytoreduction, with either hydroxyurea or interferon at any age. High-risk patients with ET should be managed with cytoreduction, using hydroxyurea at any age. Monitoring response in PV and ET should use the ELN clinicohematologic criteria. Corticosteroids, androgens, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and immunomodulators are recommended to treat anemia of PMF, whereas hydroxyurea is the first-line treatment of PMF-associated splenomegaly. Indications for splenectomy include symptomatic portal hypertension, drug-refractory painful splenomegaly, and frequent RBC transfusions. The risk of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation-related complications is justified in transplantation-eligible patients whose median survival time is expected to be less than 5 years.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Leukemia
                Leukemia
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                0887-6924
                1476-5551
                January 30 2018
                Article
                10.1038/s41375-018-0027-y
                7552081
                29535425
                4f1606c3-d226-4011-911b-ba458f45f5fa
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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