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PREPARATION OF FOSSIL AND OSTEOLOGICAL 3D-PRINTABLE MODELS FROM FREELY AVAILABLE CT-SCAN MOVIES

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Abstract

Changes in the online availability of 3D models of skeletal elements and 3D printer technology have made it feasible to develop a fossil or osteological collection from scratch. Many online sites have models that can be freely downloaded and 3D printed. Other sites have CT-scan movies online—which can be downloaded and turned into printable 3D models by using the free software suite SPIERS. Post-processing of the printed models (sanding, painting, etc.) can make them almost visually indistinguishable from real specimens.

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"Let's get physical": advantages of a physical model over 3D computer models and textbooks in learning imaging anatomy.

Three-dimensional (3D) information plays an important part in medical and veterinary education. Appreciating complex 3D spatial relationships requires a strong foundational understanding of anatomy and mental 3D visualization skills. Novel learning resources have been introduced to anatomy training to achieve this. Objective evaluation of their comparative efficacies remains scarce in the literature. This study developed and evaluated the use of a physical model in demonstrating the complex spatial relationships of the equine foot. It was hypothesized that the newly developed physical model would be more effective for students to learn magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomy of the foot than textbooks or computer-based 3D models. Third year veterinary medicine students were randomly assigned to one of three teaching aid groups (physical model; textbooks; 3D computer model). The comparative efficacies of the three teaching aids were assessed through students' abilities to identify anatomical structures on MR images. Overall mean MRI assessment scores were significantly higher in students utilizing the physical model (86.39%) compared with students using textbooks (62.61%) and the 3D computer model (63.68%) (P < 0.001), with no significant difference between the textbook and 3D computer model groups (P = 0.685). Student feedback was also more positive in the physical model group compared with both the textbook and 3D computer model groups. Our results suggest that physical models may hold a significant advantage over alternative learning resources in enhancing visuospatial and 3D understanding of complex anatomical architecture, and that 3D computer models have significant limitations with regards to 3D learning.
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3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

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Virtual skeletons using a structured light scanner to create a 3D faunal comparative collection

Author and article information

Affiliations
[Department of Geology, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL, 61455, USA]
Journal
16465806
JOURNAL OF PALEONTOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES
GEAL, Museu da Lourinha (Portugal)
1646-5806
2016
: 16
: 1-10
© 2016 Hegna and Johnson

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

CC BY 3.0

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Research article
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