Blog
About

9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Randomized Controlled Trial of Adding Telephone Follow-Up to an Occupational Rehabilitation Program to Increase Work Participation

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose Transfer from on-site rehabilitation to the participant’s daily environment is considered a weak link in the rehabilitation chain. The main objective of this study is to see if adding boosted telephone follow-up directly after completing an occupational rehabilitation program effects work participation. Methods A randomized controlled study included participants with chronic pain, chronic fatigue or common mental disorders on long-term sick leave. After completing 3½ weeks of acceptance and commitment therapy based occupational rehabilitation, participants were randomized to boosted follow-up or a control group before returning to their daily environment. The intervention was delivered over 6 months by on-site RTW coordinators mainly via telephone. Primary outcome was RTW categorized as participation in competitive work ≥1 day per week on average over 8 weeks. Results There were 213 participants of mean age 42 years old. Main diagnoses of sick leave certification were mental disorders (38%) and musculoskeletal disorders (30%). One year after discharge the intervention group had 87% increased odds (OR 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.06–3.31, p = 0.031), of (re)entry to competitive work ≥1 day per week compared with the controls, with similar positive results for sensitivity analysis of participation half time (≥2.5 days per week). The cost of boosted follow-up was 390.5 EUR per participant. Conclusion Participants receiving boosted RTW follow-up had higher (re)entry to competitive work ≥1 day per week at 1 year when compared to the control group. Adding low-cost boosted follow-up by telephone after completing an occupational rehabilitation program augmented the effect on return-to-work.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10926-017-9711-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 38

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Recommendations for a standard research assessment of insomnia.

          To present expert consensus recommendations for a standard set of research assessments in insomnia, reporting standards for these assessments, and recommendations for future research. N/A. N/A. An expert panel of 25 researchers reviewed the available literature on insomnia research assessments. Preliminary recommendations were reviewed and discussed at a meeting on March 10-11, 2005. These recommendations were further refined during writing of the current paper. The resulting key recommendations for standard research assessment of insomnia disorders include definitions/diagnosis of insomnia and comorbid conditions; measures of sleep and insomnia, including qualitative insomnia measures, diary, polysomnography, and actigraphy; and measures of the waking correlates and consequences of insomnia disorders, such as fatigue, sleepiness, mood, performance, and quality of life. Adoption of a standard research assessment of insomnia disorders will facilitate comparisons among different studies and advance the state of knowledge. These recommendations are not intended to be static but must be periodically revised to accommodate further developments and evidence in the field.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A meta-analysis of the efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy for clinically relevant mental and physical health problems.

            The current study presents the results of a meta-analysis of 39 randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), including 1,821 patients with mental disorders or somatic health problems. We searched PsycINFO, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Information provided by the ACBS (Association of Contextual Behavioral Science) community was also included. Statistical calculations were conducted using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Study quality was rated using a methodology rating form. ACT outperformed control conditions (Hedges' g = 0.57) at posttreatment and follow-up assessments in completer and intent-to-treat analyses for primary outcomes. ACT was superior to waitlist (Hedges' g = 0.82), to psychological placebo (Hedges' g = 0.51) and to treatment as usual (TAU) (we defined TAU as the standard treatment as usual; Hedges' g = 0.64). ACT was also superior on secondary outcomes (Hedges' g = 0.30), life satisfaction/quality measures (Hedges' g = 0.37) and process measures (Hedges' g = 0. 56) compared to control conditions. The comparison between ACT and established treatments (cognitive behavioral therapy) did not reveal any significant differences between these treatments (p = 0.140). Our findings indicate that ACT is more effective than treatment as usual or placebo and that ACT may be as effective in treating anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and somatic health problems as established psychological interventions. More research that focuses on quality of life and processes of change is needed to understand the added value of ACT and its transdiagnostic nature. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Reducing long term sickness absence by an activating intervention in adjustment disorders: a cluster randomised controlled design.

              To compare an innovative activating intervention with "care as usual" (control group) for the guidance of employees on sickness leave because of an adjustment disorder. It was hypothesised that the intervention would be more effective than care as usual in lowering the intensity of symptoms, increasing psychological resources, and decreasing sickness leave duration. A prospective, cluster randomised controlled trial was carried out with 192 patients on first sickness leave for an adjustment disorder. Symptom intensity, sickness duration, and return to work rates were measured at 3 months and 12 months. Analyses were performed on an intention to treat basis. At 3 months, significantly more patients in the intervention group had returned to work compared with the control group. At 12 months all patients had returned to work, but sickness leave was shorter in the intervention group than in the control group. The recurrence rate was lower in the intervention group. There were no differences between the two study groups with regard to the decrease of symptoms. At baseline, symptom intensity was higher in the patients than in a normal reference population, but decreased over time in a similar manner in both groups to approximately normal levels. The experimental intervention for adjustment disorders was successful in shortening sick leave duration, mainly by decreasing long term absenteeism.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                + 47 93016098 , karen.w.hara@ntnu.no
                Journal
                J Occup Rehabil
                J Occup Rehabil
                Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
                Springer US (New York )
                1053-0487
                1573-3688
                9 June 2017
                9 June 2017
                2018
                : 28
                : 2
                : 265-278
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 1516 2393, GRID grid.5947.f, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, , Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), ; Postbox 8905, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0627 3560, GRID grid.52522.32, Norwegian Advisory Unit on Complex Symptom Disorders, St. Olavs Hospital, , Trondheim University Hospital, ; Trondheim, Norway
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0001 1516 2393, GRID grid.5947.f, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, , Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), ; Trondheim, Norway
                [4 ]The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service of Sør-Trøndelag, Trondheim, Norway
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0627 3560, GRID grid.52522.32, Forensic Department and Research Centre Brøset, St. Olavs Hospital, , Trondheim University Hospital, ; Trondheim, Norway
                [6 ]The Norwegian Directorate for Labour and Welfare, Oslo, Norway
                [7 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0627 3560, GRID grid.52522.32, Hysnes Rehabilitation Center, St. Olavs Hospital, , Trondheim University Hospital, ; Trondheim, Norway
                [8 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0627 3560, GRID grid.52522.32, Centre for Health Care Improvement, St. Olavs Hospital, , Trondheim University Hospital, ; Trondheim, Norway
                [9 ]ISNI 0000 0001 1516 2393, GRID grid.5947.f, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Educational Sciences, , Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), ; Trondheim, Norway
                Article
                9711
                10.1007/s10926-017-9711-4
                5978834
                28597308
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

                Funding
                Funded by: The Norwegian Government, funding allocated through the Central Norway Regional Health Authority
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article