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      Social exclusion decreases prosocial behavior.

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          Abstract

          In 7 experiments, the authors manipulated social exclusion by telling people that they would end up alone later in life or that other participants had rejected them. Social exclusion caused a substantial reduction in prosocial behavior. Socially excluded people donated less money to a student fund, were unwilling to volunteer for further lab experiments, were less helpful after a mishap, and cooperated less in a mixed-motive game with another student. The results did not vary by cost to the self or by recipient of the help, and results remained significant when the experimenter was unaware of condition. The effect was mediated by feelings of empathy for another person but was not mediated by mood, state self-esteem, belongingness, trust, control, or self-awareness. The implication is that rejection temporarily interferes with emotional responses, thereby impairing the capacity for empathic understanding of others, and as a result, any inclination to help or cooperate with them is undermined. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          (View ORCID Profile)
          Journal
          Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
          Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
          American Psychological Association (APA)
          1939-1315
          0022-3514
          January 2007
          January 2007
          : 92
          : 1
          : 56-66
          Article
          10.1037/0022-3514.92.1.56
          17201542
          4f4a48d6-3a27-4053-8e67-b73437f36652
          © 2007

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