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      Hepatitis B Virus and Renal Transplantation

      a , b , a

      Nephron

      S. Karger AG

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          Most cited references 3

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          Hepatitis-B-virus resistance to lamivudine given for recurrent infection after orthotopic liver transplantation.

          Orthotopic liver transplantation for end-stage hepatitis-B-virus (HBV) infection is commonly complicated by recurrence of HBV. Lamivudine, a cytosine nucleoside analogue, has been shown to suppress HBV infection. We report the development of resistance to lamivudine in three patients who underwent transplantation for end-stage liver disease secondary to hepatitis B. Two of the patients received lamivudine for recurrent HBV infection after transplantation, whereas the third patient began treatment 1 month before transplantation in an attempt to prevent HBV recurrence after transplantation. The three patients initially responded well to treatment, but viral recurrence occurred after 9-10 months of treatment in all patients. HBV DNA was amplified from serum and sequenced through a conserved polymerase domain-the tyrosine, methionine, aspartate, aspartate (YMDD) locus. We assessed the susceptibility of HBV to lamivudine by infecting primary human hepatocytes with serum taken before the start of treatment and after recurrence in varying concentrations of lamivudine. DNA sequencing showed a common mutation within the YMDD locus of the HBV polymerase gene in all patients during lamivudine treatment. In hepatocyte cultures infected with pretreatment serum, HBV DNA concentrations were reduced to less than 6% of those in control cultures by addition of lamivudine in concentrations as low as 0.03 mumol/L. By contrast, in cultures treated with serum taken after recurrence, HBV DNA concentrations did not fall below 20% of control values, even with lamivudine at 30 mumol/L. Resistance to lamivudine has been reported in HIV patients with mutations in the YMDD locus of the polymerase gene. Our findings indicate a common mechanism of lamivudine resistance for HIV and HBV that involves similar point mutations in homologous domains of the viral polymerases.
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            Lamivudine prophylaxis against reinfection in liver transplantation for hepatitis B cirrhosis

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              Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 23-1995. A 44-year-old woman with pulmonary infiltrates, respiratory failure, and pancytopenia.

              (1995)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEF
                Nephron
                10.1159/issn.1660-8151
                Nephron
                S. Karger AG
                1660-8151
                2235-3186
                2002
                March 2002
                25 February 2002
                : 90
                : 3
                : 241-251
                Affiliations
                aDivision of Nephrology and Dialysis, Maggiore Hospital, IRCCS, Milan, Italy; bDivision of Digestive Diseases, Dumont-UCLA Transplant Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif., USA
                Article
                49058 Nephron 2002;90:241–251
                10.1159/000049058
                11867943
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 3, References: 91, Pages: 11
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/49058
                Categories
                Editorial Review

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

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