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      Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

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          Abstract

          The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO), in NM, can detect photon bounces from retro-reflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves) in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

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          APOLLO: the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

          A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to approximately one-order-of-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            2010-01-14
            2010-02-03
            Article
            1001.2358

            http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

            Custom metadata
            Prog.Phys.2010:2.31-2.35, 2010
            7 pages, 3 figures. Minor changes. Appendix added
            physics.gen-ph

            General physics

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