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Clinical Safety and Efficacy of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Sensorineural Hearing Loss Patients

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      Abstract

      Stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy for several degenerating and necrotic diseases. In several animal studies, we could find hearing restoration after inoculation of the mesenchymal stem cells' as well as mesenchymal stem cells' differentiation of hair cells and spiral ganglion. But until now, no clinical study has been reported directly for the human being. In this pilot studies, we applied mesenchymal stem cells to human beings trans-venously. Although we verified the safety of the autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation in sensorineural hearing loss patients but we could not achieve significant improvement in hearing.

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      Most cited references 14

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      From the laboratory bench to the patient's bedside: an update on clinical trials with mesenchymal stem cells.

      Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are non-hematopoietic multi-potent stem-like cells that are capable of differentiating into both mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages. In fact, in addition to bone, cartilage, fat, and myoblasts, it has been demonstrated that MSCs are capable of differentiating into neurons and astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. MSCs are of interest because they are isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow and can be easily expanded in vitro. As such, these cells are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, there are still some open questions about origin, multipotentiality, and anatomical localization of MSCs. In this review, we discuss clinical trials based on the use of MSCs in cardiovascular diseases, such as treatment of acute myocardial infarction, endstage ischemic heart disease, or prevention of vascular restenosis through stem cell-mediated injury repair. We analyze data from clinical trials for treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), which is a genetic disease characterized by production of defective type I collagen. We describe progress for neurological disease treatment with MSC transplants. We discuss data on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and on lysosomal storage diseases (Hurler syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy). A section of review is dedicated to ongoing clinical trials, involving MSCs in treatment of steroid refractory Graft Versus Host Disease (GVHD); periodontitis, which is a chronic disease affecting periodontium and causing destruction of attachment apparatus, heart failure, and bone fractures. Finally, we will provide information about biotech companies developing MSC therapy. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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        Intrinsic regenerative potential of murine cochlear supporting cells

        The lack of cochlear regenerative potential is the main cause for the permanence of hearing loss. Albeit quiescent in vivo, dissociated non-sensory cells from the neonatal cochlea proliferate and show ability to generate hair cell-like cells in vitro. Only a few non-sensory cell-derived colonies, however, give rise to hair cell-like cells, suggesting that sensory progenitor cells are a subpopulation of proliferating non-sensory cells. Here we purify from the neonatal mouse cochlea four different non-sensory cell populations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). All four populations displayed proliferative potential, but only lesser epithelial ridge and supporting cells robustly gave rise to hair cell marker-positive cells. These results suggest that cochlear supporting cells and cells of the lesser epithelial ridge show robust potential to de-differentiate into prosensory cells that proliferate and undergo differentiation in similar fashion to native prosensory cells of the developing inner ear.
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          Effects of sensory aids on the quality of life and mortality of elderly people: a multivariate analysis.

          The present study aimed at clarifying the relationships between the use of sensory aids and the quality of life (QOL) and mortality of elderly people suffering from sensory deprivation. We carried out a cross-sectional survey on the QOL and the sensory status of an elderly cohort and a 6-year longitudinal follow-up of mortality rates among 1192 non-institutionalized people aged 70-75 years in a North Italian town. We classified respondents into three groups: those with functionally adequate visual and hearing acuity (n = 275); those with sensory impairment, corrected by the use of sensory aids (n = 680), and those with uncorrected sensory impairment (n = 245). In the whole sample, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that an uncorrected sensory deprivation was associated with a significant and independent impairment of mood, self-sufficiency in instrumental activities of daily living and social relationships. Such impairments were not apparent in the subjects with sensory impairments who were using sensory aids. In men with uncorrected sensory impairment the unadjusted 6-year mortality rate was almost twice that of the other two groups, which did not differ from each other. No corresponding differences were detected in women. Multivariate analysis showed that the effect of the sensory aid status on mortality was indirect and mediated through the global physical health status and the social relationships. We conclude that our cross-sectional data demonstrate an association between uncorrected sensory deprivation and a low QOL; such an association was not present in subjects with corrected sensory deprivation.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
            [2 ]Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
            Author notes
            Address for correspondence Kyoung Ho Park, MD, PhD Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 06591, Korea Tel +82-2-2258-6213 Fax +82-2-595-1354 E-mail khpent@ 123456catholic.ac.kr
            Journal
            J Audiol Otol
            J Audiol Otol
            JAO
            Journal of Audiology & Otology
            The Korean Audiological Society and Korean Otological Society
            2384-1621
            2384-1710
            April 2018
            5 January 2018
            : 22
            : 2
            : 105-109
            29301392
            5894491
            10.7874/jao.2017.00150
            jao-2017-00150
            Copyright © 2018 The Korean Audiological Society and Korean Otological Society

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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