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      Lighting up micromotors with quantum dots for smart chemical sensing

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          Abstract

          A novel “on-the-fly” chemical detection strategy based on coupling of the optical properties of QDs and the autonomous movement of micromachines is described.

          Abstract

          A new “on-the-fly” chemical optical detection strategy based on the incorporation of fluorescence CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on the surface of self-propelled tubular micromotors is presented. The motion-accelerated binding of trace Hg to the QDs selectively quenches the fluorescence emission and leads to an effective discrimination between different mercury species and other co-existing ions.

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          Most cited references36

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          Semiconductor Clusters, Nanocrystals, and Quantum Dots

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            Small power: Autonomous nano- and micromotors propelled by self-generated gradients

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              Rolled-up nanotech on polymers: from basic perception to self-propelled catalytic microengines.

              In this tutorial review we describe the recent progress on catalytic microtubular engines fabricated by rolled-up nanotech on polymers. We summarize the technical aspects of the technology and the basic principles that cause the catalytic microengines to self-propel in fuel solutions. The control over speed, directionality and interactions of the microengines to perform tasks such as cargo transportation is also discussed. We compare this technology to other fabrication techniques of catalytic micro-/nanomotors and outline challenges and opportunities for such engines in future studies. Since rolled-up nanotech on polymers can easily integrate almost any type of inorganic material, huge potential and advanced performance such as high speed, cargo delivery, motion control, and dynamic assembly are foreseen--ultimately promising a practical way to construct versatile and intelligent catalytic tubular microrobots.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CHCOFS
                Chemical Communications
                Chem. Commun.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1359-7345
                1364-548X
                2015
                2015
                : 51
                : 74
                : 14088-14091
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of NanoEngineering
                [2 ]University of California
                [3 ]La Jolla
                [4 ]USA
                [5 ]Department of Analytical Chemistry
                [6 ]Physical Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
                [7 ]University of Alcala
                [8 ]Alcala de Henares E-28871
                [9 ]Madrid
                Article
                10.1039/C5CC04726A
                50604d9f-d47b-4ac9-b00d-41a8e9f9e9a1
                © 2015
                History

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