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      Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study of Removal of Eosin Yellow from Aqueous Solution Using Teak Leaf Litter Powder

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          Abstract

          Low-cost teak leaf litter powder (TLLP) was prepared as possible substitute for activated carbon. The feasibility of using the adsorbent to remove eosin yellow (EY) dye from aqueous solution was investigated through equilibrium adsorption, kinetic and thermodynamic studies. The removal of dye from aqueous solution was feasible but influenced by temperature, pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. Variation in the initial concentration of dye did not influence the equilibrium contact time. Optimum adsorption of dye occurred at low adsorbent dosages, alkaline pH and high temperatures. Langmuir isotherm model best fit the equilibrium adsorption data and the maximum monolayer capacity of the adsorbent was 31.64 mg g −1 at 303 K. The adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second order kinetic model at 303 K. Boundary layer diffusion played a key role in the adsorption process. The mechanism of uptake of EY by TLLP was controlled by both liquid film diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The values of mean adsorption free energy, E (7.91 kJ mol −1), and standard enthalpy, ΔH° (+13.34 kJ mol −1), suggest physical adsorption. The adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Teak leaf litter powder is a promising low-cost adsorbent for treating wastewaters containing eosin yellow.

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          Most cited references 45

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          THE ADSORPTION OF GASES ON PLANE SURFACES OF GLASS, MICA AND PLATINUM.

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            Pseudo-second order model for sorption processes

             Y.S Ho,  G. McKay (1999)
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              Water splitting. Metal-free efficient photocatalyst for stable visible water splitting via a two-electron pathway.

              The use of solar energy to produce molecular hydrogen and oxygen (H2 and O2) from overall water splitting is a promising means of renewable energy storage. In the past 40 years, various inorganic and organic systems have been developed as photocatalysts for water splitting driven by visible light. These photocatalysts, however, still suffer from low quantum efficiency and/or poor stability. We report the design and fabrication of a metal-free carbon nanodot-carbon nitride (C3N4) nanocomposite and demonstrate its impressive performance for photocatalytic solar water splitting. We measured quantum efficiencies of 16% for wavelength λ = 420 ± 20 nanometers, 6.29% for λ = 580 ± 15 nanometers, and 4.42% for λ = 600 ± 10 nanometers, and determined an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 2.0%. The catalyst comprises low-cost, Earth-abundant, environmentally friendly materials and shows excellent stability.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                emmanola@gmail.com
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                22 September 2017
                22 September 2017
                2017
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000000109466120, GRID grid.9829.a, Department of Chemistry, , Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, ; Kumasi, Ghana
                [2 ]Faculty of Public Health, Catholic University College, Fiapre, Sunyani, Ghana
                [3 ]GRID grid.442305.4, Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, , University for Development Studies, ; Tamale, Ghana
                Article
                12424
                10.1038/s41598-017-12424-1
                5610235
                28939814
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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