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      Food Analysis Using Organelle DNA and the Effects of Processing on Assays

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      Annual Review of Food Science and Technology

      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          Extrachromosomal DNA such as organelle DNA are increasingly targeted in molecular detection assays where samples have been degraded by physical or chemical means. Owing to multiple organelles per cell and greater copy numbers than nuclear genes, organelle gene targets provide a more robust signal in polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR (qPCR), and other emerging molecular technologies. Because of these advantages, direct analysis of organelle DNA in food matrices is used for detection of contaminants and identification and authentication of food ingredients and allergens. Non-nuclear DNA is also used as an assay normalizer for detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in foods. This review describes these protocols plus the effects of processing on efficacy, with special emphasis on thermally produced DNA fragmentation. Future research may incorporate molecular techniques beyond detection, used instead as time-temperature indicators in thermal food processing or quality indicators in food fermentation or acidification.

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          The complete nucleotide sequence and RNA editing content of the mitochondrial genome of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.): comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes of rapeseed and Arabidopsis thaliana.

          The entire mitochondrial genome of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) was sequenced and compared with that of Arabidopsis thaliana. The 221 853 bp genome contains 34 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 17 tRNA genes. This gene content is almost identical to that of Arabidopsis: However the rps14 gene, which is a pseudo-gene in Arabidopsis, is intact in rapeseed. On the other hand, five tRNA genes are missing in rapeseed compared to Arabidopsis, although the set of mitochondrially encoded tRNA species is identical in the two Cruciferae. RNA editing events were systematically investigated on the basis of the sequence of the rapeseed mitochondrial genome. A total of 427 C to U conversions were identified in ORFs, which is nearly identical to the number in Arabidopsis (441 sites). The gene sequences and intron structures are mostly conserved (more than 99% similarity for protein-coding regions); however, only 358 editing sites (83% of total editings) are shared by rapeseed and Arabidopsis: Non-coding regions are mostly divergent between the two plants. One-third (about 78.7 kb) and two-thirds (about 223.8 kb) of the rapeseed and Arabidopsis mitochondrial genomes, respectively, cannot be aligned with each other and most of these regions do not show any homology to sequences registered in the DNA databases. The results of the comparative analysis between the rapeseed and Arabidopsis mitochondrial genomes suggest that higher plant mitochondria are extremely conservative with respect to coding sequences and somewhat conservative with respect to RNA editing, but that non-coding parts of plant mitochondrial DNA are extraordinarily dynamic with respect to structural changes, sequence acquisition and/or sequence loss.
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            DNA barcoding as a new tool for food traceability

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              Food forensics: using DNA technology to combat misdescription and fraud.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Food Science and Technology
                Annu. Rev. Food Sci. Technol.
                Annual Reviews
                1941-1413
                1941-1421
                February 28 2017
                February 28 2017
                : 8
                : 1
                : 57-74
                Affiliations
                [1 ]TransAgra International Inc., Storm Lake, Iowa 50588;
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-food-030216-030216
                © 2017

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