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      Pathogenesis of adhesion formation/reformation: Application to reproductive pelvic surgery

      ,
      Microsurgery
      Wiley

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          Reduction of postoperative pelvic adhesions with intraperitoneal 32% dextran 70: a prospective, randomized clinical trial.

          (1983)
          Infertile women of reproductive age requiring an operation for distal tubal disease, endometriosis, or pelvic adhesions were recruited from nine study centers. Prior to closing the peritoneal cavity, 250 ml of 32% dextran 70 (n = 55) or saline (n = 47) was instilled into the dependent portion of the pelvis; 8 to 12 weeks later, laparoscopy was performed on those patients not pregnant. Patients with severe adnexal adhesions at the initial laparotomy had a greater reduction in adhesions if they received 32% dextran 70. Further, patients with a marked reduction in adhesion formation following the initial laparotomy were found to occur more frequently in the 32% dextran 70-treated group (26 of 51 for 32% dextran 70 versus 12 of 40 for saline; P less than 0.05). During second-look laparoscopy, adhesions were found to occur more frequently in control patients than in 32% dextran 70-treated patients at the following anatomic sites: ovary (P less than 0.05); cul-de-sac (P = 0.017); pelvic side wall (P less than 0.001). Thus, in a prospective, randomized, blinded clinical trial, the intraperitoneal high-molecular-weight dextran was found to reduce postoperative adhesion formation effectively.
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            Adhesion formation after tubal surgery: results of the eighth-day laparoscopy in 188 patients.

            First-look laparoscopy (FL) on the eighth day after salpingostomy, fimbrioplasty, or adhesiolysis was performed in 188 patients. Behavior of postoperative adhesions and the occurrence of pregnancy after tubal surgery were compared with a similar group of 127 patients in whom no FL was performed. In greater than 50% of the cases (104/188), adhesions were found on the eighth postoperative day around both adnexa or the only remaining adnexum. Adhesions were mainly located between the ampulla and the ovary and between the ovary and the lateral pelvic wall or broad ligament. More than half of the adhesions that were separated at FL did not recur. It was concluded that FL significantly diminished the occurrence of permanent pelvic adhesions. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy after salpingostomy was significantly lower when FL was performed. FL on the eighth postoperative day can be regarded as a well-accepted procedure with few complications.
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              Failure of intraperitoneal adjuncts to improve the outcome of pelvic operations in young women.

              An examination was made of the possibility that 100 to 200 ml of intraperitoneal 32% dextran 70 and/or 0.5% hydrocortisone sodium succinate (randomized independently with similar volumes of Ringer's lactate solution) might help to lessen the postoperative formation of adhesions among patients undergoing surgical procedures for peritubal adhesions (n = 76), endometriosis (n = 27), or midtubal occlusion (n = 61). Patients in the first two groups who were given intraperitoneal corticosteroids were also given systemic steroids. Nonparametric comparison of median adhesion scores at operation and at subsequent laparoscopy showed that there was a poorer outcome with dextran than when dextran was not used in every subgroup except one (repeat salpingolysis after previous operation for adhesions), including first operations for adnexal adhesions (Mann-Whitney U = 200, m = 23, n = 26; p less than 0.05). The probability was small (p beta less than 0.002) that an important beneficial effect of dextran was overlooked. Systemic corticosteroids were associated with a consistent trend toward improved outcome, especially in patients who initially had few or no adhesions, such as those operated on for endometriosis (U = 2, m = 7, n = 4; p less than 0.025), but among patients with tubal resections and anastomoses with adnexal adhesions the use of intraperitoneal hydrocortisone alone was associated with a worse outcome (U = 15, m = 12, n = 8; p less than 0.02). Life-table analysis of the accumulating probability of pregnancy showed that no significant difference resulted from adjunct use in any group. The conclusion is that no empiric basis supports the use of intraperitoneal 32% dextran 70 or 0.5% hydrocortisone in the attempt to prevent peritoneal adhesions, but further investigations on the systemic administration of corticosteroids to decrease the formation of adhesions would be useful.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Microsurgery
                Microsurgery
                Wiley
                07381085
                10982752
                1987
                1987
                : 8
                : 2
                : 103-107
                Article
                10.1002/micr.1920080215
                518234e3-6dbf-4e61-8db1-f082e24ed364
                © 1987

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/micr.1920080215

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