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Maternal high-fat diet induces hyperproliferation and alters Pten/Akt signaling in prostates of offspring

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      Abstract

      Developing recommendations for prostate cancer prevention requires identification of modifiable risk factors. Maternal exposure to high-fat diet (HFD) initiates a broad array of second-generation adult disorders in murine models and humans. Here, we investigate whether maternal HFD in mice affects incidence of prostate hyperplasia in offspring. Using three independent assays, we demonstrate that maternal HFD is sufficient to initiate prostate hyperproliferation in adult male offspring. HFD-exposed prostate tissues do not increase in size, but instead concomitantly up-regulate apoptosis. Maternal HFD-induced phenotypes are focally present in young adult subjects and greatly exacerbated in aged subjects. HFD-exposed prostate tissues additionally exhibit increased levels of activated Akt and deactivated Pten. Taken together, we conclude that maternal HFD diet is a candidate modifiable risk factor for prostate cancer initiation in later life.

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      Most cited references 53

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      Cancer statistics, 2013.

      Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival based on incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. A total of 1,660,290 new cancer cases and 580,350 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States in 2013. During the most recent 5 years for which there are data (2005-2009), delay-adjusted cancer incidence rates declined slightly in men (by 0.6% per year) and were stable in women, while cancer death rates decreased by 1.8% per year in men and by 1.5% per year in women. Overall, cancer death rates have declined 20% from their peak in 1991 (215.1 per 100,000 population) to 2009 (173.1 per 100,000 population). Death rates continue to decline for all 4 major cancer sites (lung, colorectum, breast, and prostate). Over the past 10 years of data (2000-2009), the largest annual declines in death rates were for chronic myeloid leukemia (8.4%), cancers of the stomach (3.1%) and colorectum (3.0%), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (3.0%). The reduction in overall cancer death rates since 1990 in men and 1991 in women translates to the avoidance of approximately 1.18 million deaths from cancer, with 152,900 of these deaths averted in 2009 alone. Further progress can be accelerated by applying existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population, with an emphasis on those groups in the lowest socioeconomic bracket and other underserved populations. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society, Inc.
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        The functions and regulation of the PTEN tumour suppressor.

        The importance of the physiological function of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is illustrated by its frequent disruption in cancer. By suppressing the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway through its lipid phosphatase activity, PTEN governs a plethora of cellular processes including survival, proliferation, energy metabolism and cellular architecture. Consequently, mechanisms regulating PTEN expression and function, including transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation by non-coding RNAs, post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions, are all altered in cancer. The repertoire of PTEN functions has recently been expanded to include phosphatase-independent activities and crucial functions within the nucleus. Our increasing knowledge of PTEN and pathologies in which its function is altered will undoubtedly inform the rational design of novel therapies.
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          Crucial role of p53-dependent cellular senescence in suppression of Pten-deficient tumorigenesis.

          Cellular senescence has been theorized to oppose neoplastic transformation triggered by activation of oncogenic pathways in vitro, but the relevance of senescence in vivo has not been established. The PTEN and p53 tumour suppressors are among the most commonly inactivated or mutated genes in human cancer including prostate cancer. Although they are functionally distinct, reciprocal cooperation has been proposed, as PTEN is thought to regulate p53 stability, and p53 to enhance PTEN transcription. Here we show that conditional inactivation of Trp53 in the mouse prostate fails to produce a tumour phenotype, whereas complete Pten inactivation in the prostate triggers non-lethal invasive prostate cancer after long latency. Strikingly, combined inactivation of Pten and Trp53 elicits invasive prostate cancer as early as 2 weeks after puberty and is invariably lethal by 7 months of age. Importantly, acute Pten inactivation induces growth arrest through the p53-dependent cellular senescence pathway both in vitro and in vivo, which can be fully rescued by combined loss of Trp53. Furthermore, we detected evidence of cellular senescence in specimens from early-stage human prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate the relevance of cellular senescence in restricting tumorigenesis in vivo and support a model for cooperative tumour suppression in which p53 is an essential failsafe protein of Pten-deficient tumours.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine 425 South Euclid Ave. BJC-IH 10th Floor, Campus Box 8064 Saint Louis , MO 63110
            [2 ]Department of Pathology and Immunology Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine Peters Building , 3 rd Floor Saint Louis, MO 63110
            [3 ]State key laboratory of reproductive medicine Nanjing Medical University Nanjing , China 210029
            Author notes
            Journal
            Sci Rep
            Sci Rep
            Scientific Reports
            Nature Publishing Group
            2045-2322
            10 December 2013
            2013
            : 3
            3857567 srep03466 10.1038/srep03466
            Copyright © 2013, Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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