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      Ulcerative colitis

      , , , ,

      The Lancet

      Elsevier BV

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          Infliximab for induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis.

          Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha, is an established treatment for Crohn's disease but not ulcerative colitis. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies--the Active Ulcerative Colitis Trials 1 and 2 (ACT 1 and ACT 2, respectively)--evaluated the efficacy of infliximab for induction and maintenance therapy in adults with ulcerative colitis. In each study, 364 patients with moderate-to-severe active ulcerative colitis despite treatment with concurrent medications received placebo or infliximab (5 mg or 10 mg per kilogram of body weight) intravenously at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and then every eight weeks through week 46 (in ACT 1) or week 22 (in ACT 2). Patients were followed for 54 weeks in ACT 1 and 30 weeks in ACT 2. In ACT 1, 69 percent of patients who received 5 mg of infliximab and 61 percent of those who received 10 mg had a clinical response at week 8, as compared with 37 percent of those who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). A response was defined as a decrease in the Mayo score of at least 3 points and at least 30 percent, with an accompanying decrease in the subscore for rectal bleeding of at least 1 point or an absolute rectal-bleeding subscore of 0 or 1. In ACT 2, 64 percent of patients who received 5 mg of infliximab and 69 percent of those who received 10 mg had a clinical response at week 8, as compared with 29 percent of those who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). In both studies, patients who received infliximab were more likely to have a clinical response at week 30 (P< or =0.002 for all comparisons). In ACT 1, more patients who received 5 mg or 10 mg of infliximab had a clinical response at week 54 (45 percent and 44 percent, respectively) than did those who received placebo (20 percent, P<0.001 for both comparisons). Patients with moderate-to-severe active ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every eight weeks thereafter were more likely to have a clinical response at weeks 8, 30, and 54 than were those receiving placebo. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00036439 and NCT00096655.) Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.
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            Inflammatory bowel disease: clinical aspects and established and evolving therapies.

            Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two idiopathic inflammatory bowel disorders. In this paper we discuss the current diagnostic approach, their pathology, natural course, and common complications, the assessment of disease activity, extraintestinal manifestations, and medical and surgical management, and provide diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms. We critically review the evidence for established (5-aminosalicylic acid compounds, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, calcineurin inhibitors) and emerging novel therapies--including biological therapies--directed at cytokines (eg, infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol) and receptors (eg, visilizumab, abatacept) involved in T-cell activation, selective adhesion molecule blockers (eg, natalizumab, MLN-02, alicaforsen), anti-inflammatory cytokines (eg, interleukin 10), modulation of the intestinal flora (eg, antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics), leucocyte apheresis and many more monoclonal antibodies, small molecules, recombinant growth factors, and MAP kinase inhibitors targeting various inflammatory cells and pathways. Finally, we summarise the practical aspects of standard therapies including dosing, precautions, and side-effects.
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              Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Induces Remission in Patients With Active Ulcerative Colitis in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

              Ulcerative colitis (UC) is difficult to treat, and standard therapy does not always induce remission. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative approach that induced remission in small series of patients with active UC. We investigated its safety and efficacy in a placebo-controlled randomized trial.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Lancet
                The Lancet
                Elsevier BV
                01406736
                April 2017
                April 2017
                : 389
                : 10080
                : 1756-1770
                Article
                10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32126-2
                6487890
                27914657
                © 2017

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