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      Social anxiety and Internet gaming disorder: The role of motives and metacognitions

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          Abstract

          Background and aims

          In recent years, Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) has been recognized as a mental health problem. Although research has found that social anxiety, motives, the preference for online social interactions (POSI), and metacognitions about online gaming are independent predictors of IGD, less is known about their relative contribution to IGD. The aim of the current study was to model the relationship between social anxiety, motives, POSI, metacognitions about online gaming, and IGD.

          Methods

          Five hundred and forty three Italian gamers who play more than 7 h a week (mean age = 23.9 years; SD = 6.15 years; 82.5% males) were included in the study. The pattern of relationships specified by the theoretical model was examined through path analysis.

          Results

          Results showed that social anxiety was directly associated with four motives (escape, coping, fantasy, and recreation), POSI, and positive and negative metacognitions about online gaming, and IGD. The Sobel test showed that negative metacognitions about online gaming played the strongest mediating role in the relationship between social anxiety and IGD followed by escape, POSI, and positive metacognitions. The model accounted for 54% of the variance for IGD.

          Discussion and conclusions

          Overall, our findings show that, along with motives and POSI, metacognitions about online gaming may play an important role in the association between social anxiety and IGD. The clinical and preventive implications of these findings are discussed.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          2006
          Journal of Behavioral Addictions
          J Behav Addict
          Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
          2062-5871
          2063-5303
          23 July 2020
          Affiliations
          [1 ] deptDepartment of Developmental and Social Psychology , University of Padova, Padova, Italy
          [2 ] deptDivision of Psychology, School of Applied Sciences , London South Bank University, London, UK
          [3 ] Studi Cognitivi , Milan, Italy
          [4 ] Sigmund Freud University , Milan, Italy
          [5 ] deptDipartimento di Scienze Umane e Sociali , Università della Valle d'Aosta, Aosta, Italy
          Author notes
          []Corresponding author. E-mail: claudia.marino@ 123456unipd.it
          Article
          10.1556/2006.2020.00044
          © 2020 The Author(s)

          Open Access statement. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

          Page count
          Figures: 02, Tables: 02, References: 70, Pages: 12
          Categories
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