Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35–49 yrs and 50–74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35–49 and 50–74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50–74 yr group than in the 35–49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 31

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Replacing caloric beverages with water or diet beverages for weight loss in adults: main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial1234

      Background: Replacement of caloric beverages with noncaloric beverages may be a simple strategy for promoting modest weight reduction; however, the effectiveness of this strategy is not known. Objective: We compared the replacement of caloric beverages with water or diet beverages (DBs) as a method of weight loss over 6 mo in adults and attention controls (ACs). Design: Overweight and obese adults [n = 318; BMI (in kg/m2): 36.3 ± 5.9; 84% female; age (mean ± SD): 42 ± 10.7 y; 54% black] substituted noncaloric beverages (water or DBs) for caloric beverages (≥200 kcal/d) or made dietary changes of their choosing (AC) for 6 mo. Results: In an intent-to-treat analysis, a significant reduction in weight and waist circumference and an improvement in systolic blood pressure were observed from 0 to 6 mo. Mean (±SEM) weight losses at 6 mo were −2.5 ± 0.45% in the DB group, −2.03 ± 0.40% in the Water group, and −1.76 ± 0.35% in the AC group; there were no significant differences between groups. The chance of achieving a 5% weight loss at 6 mo was greater in the DB group than in the AC group (OR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.05, 5.01; P = 0.04). A significant reduction in fasting glucose at 6 mo (P = 0.019) and improved hydration at 3 (P = 0.0017) and 6 (P = 0.049) mo was observed in the Water group relative to the AC group. In a combined analysis, participants assigned to beverage replacement were 2 times as likely to have achieved a 5% weight loss (OR: 2.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 4.22; P = 0.04) than were the AC participants. Conclusions: Replacement of caloric beverages with noncaloric beverages as a weight-loss strategy resulted in average weight losses of 2% to 2.5%. This strategy could have public health significance and is a simple, straightforward message. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01017783.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        An index for measuring the wear of teeth.

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE): a new scoring system for scientific and clinical needs

          A new scoring system, the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE), has been designed to provide a simple tool for use in general practice and to allow comparison to other more discriminative indices. The most severely affected surface in each sextant is recorded with a four level score and the cumulative score classified and matched to risk levels which guide the management of the condition. The BEWE allows re-analysis and integration of results from existing studies and, in time, should initiate a consensus within the scientific community and so avoid continued proliferation of indices. Finally, this process should lead to the development of an internationally accepted, standardised and validated index. The BEWE further aims to increase the awareness of tooth erosion amongst clinicians and general dental practitioners and to provide a guide as to its management.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan City, China
            The Ohio State University, UNITED STATES
            Author notes

            Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

            • Conceptualization: HJ MQD BJT.

            • Formal analysis: ZW YGD HJ.

            • Investigation: ZW JZ MQD.

            • Methodology: HJ ZW JZ.

            • Validation: MQD BJT.

            • Writing – original draft: HJ YGD.

            • Writing – review & editing: ZW HJ.

            Contributors
            Role: Editor
            Journal
            PLoS One
            PLoS ONE
            plos
            plosone
            PLoS ONE
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
            1932-6203
            1 September 2016
            2016
            : 11
            : 9
            27583435 5008775 10.1371/journal.pone.0162181 PONE-D-16-07227
            © 2016 Wei et al

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

            Counts
            Figures: 1, Tables: 6, Pages: 14
            Product
            Funding
            The authors received no specific funding for this work.
            Categories
            Research Article
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Anatomy
            Digestive System
            Teeth
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Anatomy
            Digestive System
            Teeth
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Anatomy
            Head
            Jaw
            Teeth
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Anatomy
            Head
            Jaw
            Teeth
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Anatomy
            Digestive System
            Teeth
            Dentin
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Anatomy
            Digestive System
            Teeth
            Dentin
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Anatomy
            Head
            Jaw
            Teeth
            Dentin
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Anatomy
            Head
            Jaw
            Teeth
            Dentin
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Physiology
            Physiological Processes
            Food Consumption
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Physiology
            Physiological Processes
            Food Consumption
            People and Places
            Population Groupings
            Age Groups
            Physical sciences
            Chemistry
            Chemical compounds
            Organic compounds
            Vitamins
            Vitamin C
            Physical sciences
            Chemistry
            Organic chemistry
            Organic compounds
            Vitamins
            Vitamin C
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Physiology
            Digestive Physiology
            Dentition
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Physiology
            Digestive Physiology
            Dentition
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Behavior
            Habits
            Ecology and Environmental Sciences
            Natural Resources
            Water Resources
            Custom metadata
            All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

            Uncategorized

            Comments

            Comment on this article