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      The FrogID dataset: expert-validated occurrence records of Australia’s frogs collected by citizen scientists

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      ZooKeys

      Pensoft Publishers

      amphibians, bioacoustics, biodiversity data, citizen science, smartphone

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          Abstract

          Abstract

          This dataset represents expert-validated occurrence records of calling frogs across Australia collected via the national citizen science project FrogID ( http://www.frogid.net.au). FrogID relies on participants recording calling frogs using smartphone technology, after which point the frogs are identified by expert validators, resulting in a database of georeferenced frog species records. This dataset represents one full year of the project (10 November 2017–9 November 2018), including 54,864 records of 172 species, 71% of the known frog species in Australia. This is the first instalment of the dataset, and we anticipate providing updated datasets on an annual basis.

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          Most cited references 28

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          The current state of citizen science as a tool for ecological research and public engagement

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            Modelling distribution and abundance with presence-only data

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              Towards the global monitoring of biodiversity change.

              Governments have set the ambitious target of reducing biodiversity loss by the year 2010. The scientific community now faces the challenge of assessing the progress made towards this target and beyond. Here, we review current monitoring efforts and propose a global biodiversity monitoring network to complement and enhance these efforts. The network would develop a global sampling programme for indicator taxa (we suggest birds and vascular plants) and would integrate regional sampling programmes for taxa that are locally relevant to the monitoring of biodiversity change. The network would also promote the development of comparable maps of global land cover at regular time intervals. The extent and condition of specific habitat types, such as wetlands and coral reefs, would be monitored based on regional programmes. The data would then be integrated with other environmental and socioeconomic indicators to design responses to reduce biodiversity loss.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Zookeys
                Zookeys
                2
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:45048D35-BB1D-5CE8-9668-537E44BD4C7E
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:91BD42D4-90F1-4B45-9350-EEF175B1727A
                ZooKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2989
                1313-2970
                2020
                17 February 2020
                : 912
                : 139-151
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Australian Museum Research Institute, Australian Museum, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia Australian Museum Research Institute Sydney Australia
                [2 ] Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia University of New South Wales Sydney Australia
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Jodi J. L. Rowley ( jodi.rowley@ 123456austmus.gov.au )

                Academic editor: A. Ohler

                Article
                38253
                10.3897/zookeys.912.38253
                7040047
                Jodi J.L. Rowley, Corey T. Callaghan

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Funding
                Funded by: Australian Museum 501100001148 http://doi.org/10.13039/501100001148
                Categories
                Data Paper
                Anura
                Biodiversity & Conservation
                Australasia

                Animal science & Zoology

                smartphone, citizen science, biodiversity data, bioacoustics, amphibians

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