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      Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain

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          Abstract

          This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER) formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone) with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen), are available solely in immediate-release (IR) formulations.

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          Most cited references 12

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          RELIEVING PAIN IN AMERICA: A BLUEPRINT FOR TRANSFORMING PREVENTION, CARE, EDUCATION, AND RESEARCH

           Lee S. Simon (2012)
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            The effect of opioid therapy on endocrine function.

             A. J. Brennan (2013)
            Opioids are an established option in the analgesic armamentarium for managing moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Long-term opioid use, however, is associated with several potential adverse effects and toxicities, such as peripheral edema, immune suppression, hyperalgesia, sleep apnea, and changes in endocrine function, many of which are not fully appreciated. Opioid endocrinopathy can greatly affect patients, causing reduced sexual function, decreased libido, infertility, mood disorders, osteoporosis, and osteopenia. Furthermore, although opioid endocrinopathy appears to be common, many patients do not report their symptoms, thus causing this adverse effect to go unnoticed and without clinical monitoring, particularly in patients chronically taking the equivalent of ≥ 100 mg of morphine daily. Indeed, diagnosing hypogonadism as opioid-related can be challenged by other influences on endocrine function, such as pain pathophysiology, comorbidities, other drug therapies, and patient age. Management options for opioid endocrinopathy include discontinuing opioid therapy, reducing the opioid dose, switching to a different opioid, and hormone supplementation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Tramadol-induced adrenal insufficiency.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2015
                21 October 2015
                : 8
                : 719-728
                Affiliations
                [1 ]David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                [2 ]Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                [3 ]UCLA Ambulatory Surgery Center, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                [4 ]UCLA Wasserman Eye Institute, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                [5 ]UCLA Martin Luther King Community Hospital, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Mary Hanna Bekhit, Department of Anesthesiology David Geffen School of Medicine University of California, Los Angeles 757 Westwood Plaza, Suite 2331 Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, Tel +1 310 825 6301, Email mbekhit@ 123456mednet.ucla.edu
                Article
                jpr-8-719
                10.2147/JPR.S73567
                4621217
                © 2015 Bekhit. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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