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Intonational structure in Japanese and English

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Phonology

Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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      Most cited references 7

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      Some Acoustic Correlates of Word Stress in American English

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        Stress and Non-Stress Accent

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          The perception of fundamental frequency declination.

          A series of experiments was carried out to investigate how fundamental frequency declination is perceived by speakers of English. Using linear predictor coded speech, nonsense sentences were constructed in which fundamental frequency on the last stressed syllable had been systematically varied. Listeners were asked to judge which stressed syllable was higher in pitch. Their judgments were found to reflect normalization for expected declination; in general, when two stressed syllables sounded equal in pitch, the second was actually lower. The pattern of normalization reflected certain major features of production patterns: A greater correction for declination was made for wide pitch range stimuli than for narrow pitch range stimuli. The slope of expected declination was less for longer stimuli than for shorter ones. Lastly, amplitude was found to have a significant effect on judgments, suggesting that the amplitude downdrift which normally accompanies fundamental frequency declination may have an important role in the perception of phrasing.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            applab
            Phonology
            Phonology
            Cambridge University Press (CUP)
            0952-6757
            1469-8188
            May 1986
            October 2008
            : 3
            :
            : 255
            10.1017/S095267570000066X
            © 1986

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