Blog
About

3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Estimating Demand for Germline Genome Editing: An In Vitro Fertilization Clinic Perspective

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 39

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The nature of aneuploidy with increasing age of the female partner: a review of 15,169 consecutive trophectoderm biopsies evaluated with comprehensive chromosomal screening.

          To determine the relationship between the age of the female partner and the prevalence and nature of human embryonic aneuploidy. Retrospective. Academic. Trophectoderm biopsies. Comprehensive chromosomal screening performed on patients with blastocysts available for biopsy. Evaluation of the impact of maternal age on the prevalence of aneuploidy, the probability of having no euploid embryos within a cohort, the complexity of aneuploidy as gauged by the number of aneuploid chromosomes, and the trisomy/monosomy ratio. Aneuploidy increased predictably after 26 years of age. A slightly increased prevalence was noted at younger ages, with >40% aneuploidy in women 23 years and under. The no euploid embryo rate was lowest (2% to 6%) in women aged 26 to 37, was 33% at age 42, and was 53% at age 44. Among the biopsies with aneuploidy, 64% involved a single chromosome, 20% two chromosomes, and 16% three chromosomes, with the proportion of more complex aneuploidy increasing with age. Finally, the trisomy/monosomy ratio approximated 1 and increased minimally with age. The lowest risk for embryonic aneuploidy was between ages 26 and 30. Both younger and older age groups had higher rates of aneuploidy and an increased risk for more complex aneuploidies. The overall risk did not measurably change after age 43. Trisomies and monosomies are equally prevalent. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Blastocyst biopsy with comprehensive chromosome screening and fresh embryo transfer significantly increases in vitro fertilization implantation and delivery rates: a randomized controlled trial.

            To determine whether blastocyst biopsy and rapid quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) improves in vitro fertilization (IVF) implantation and delivery rates. Randomized controlled trial. Academic reproductive medicine center. Infertile couples in whom the female partner (or oocyte donor) is between the ages of 21 and 42 years who are attempting conception through IVF. Embryonic aneuploidy screening. Sustained implantation and delivery rates. We transferred 134 blastocysts to 72 patients in the study (CCS) group and 163 blastocysts to 83 patients in the routine care (control) group. Sustained implantation rates (probability that an embryo will implant and progress to delivery) were statistically significantly higher in the CCS group (89 of 134; 66.4%) compared with those from the control group (78 of 163; 47.9%). Delivery rates per cycle were also statistically significantly higher in the CCS group. Sixty one of 72 treatment cycles using CCS led to delivery (84.7%), and 56 of 83 (67.5%) control cycles ultimately delivered. Outcomes were excellent in both groups, but use of CCS clearly improved patient outcomes. Blastocyst biopsy with rapid qPCR-based comprehensive chromosomal screening results in statistically significantly improved IVF outcomes, as evidenced by meaningful increases in sustained implantation and delivery rates. NCT01219283. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Genome editing reveals a role for OCT4 in human embryogenesis

              Summary Despite their fundamental biological and clinical importance, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the first cell fate decisions in the human embryo are not well understood. Here we use CRISPR–Cas9-mediated genome editing to investigate the function of the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 during human embryogenesis. We identified an efficient OCT4-targeting guide RNA using an inducible human embryonic stem cell-based system and microinjection of mouse zygotes. Using these refined methods, we efficiently and specifically targeted the gene encoding OCT4 (POU5F1) in diploid human zygotes and found that blastocyst development was compromised. Transcriptomics analysis revealed that, in POU5F1-null cells, gene expression was downregulated not only for extra-embryonic trophectoderm genes, such as CDX2, but also for regulators of the pluripotent epiblast, including NANOG. By contrast, Pou5f1-null mouse embryos maintained the expression of orthologous genes, and blastocyst development was established, but maintenance was compromised. We conclude that CRISPR–Cas9-mediated genome editing is a powerful method for investigating gene function in the context of human development.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The CRISPR Journal
                The CRISPR Journal
                Mary Ann Liebert Inc
                2573-1599
                2573-1602
                October 01 2019
                October 01 2019
                : 2
                : 5
                : 304-315
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Zouves Fertility Center, Foster City, California.
                [2 ]Zouves Foundation for Reproductive Medicine, Foster City, California.
                [3 ]School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom.
                [4 ]Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Hunter College, New York, New York.
                Article
                10.1089/crispr.2019.0044
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article