Blog
About

12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Pinot blanc and Pinot gris arose as independent somatic mutations of Pinot noir

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Somatic mutation is a natural mechanism which allows plant growers to develop new cultivars. As a source of variation within a uniform genetic background, it also represents an ideal tool for studying the genetic make-up of important traits and for establishing gene functions. Layer-specific molecular characterization of the Pinot family of grape cultivars was conducted to provide an evolutionary explanation for the somatic mutations that have affected the locus of berry colour. Through the study of the structural dynamics along chromosome 2, a very large deletion present in a single Pinot gris cell layer was identified and characterized. This mutation reveals that Pinot gris and Pinot blanc arose independently from the ancestral Pinot noir, suggesting a novel parallel evolutionary model. This proposed ‘Pinot-model’ represents a breakthrough towards the full understanding of the mechanisms behind the formation of white, grey, red, and pink grape cultivars, and eventually of their specific enological aptitude.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 32

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found
          Is Open Access

          The grapevine genome sequence suggests ancestral hexaploidization in major angiosperm phyla.

          The analysis of the first plant genomes provided unexpected evidence for genome duplication events in species that had previously been considered as true diploids on the basis of their genetics. These polyploidization events may have had important consequences in plant evolution, in particular for species radiation and adaptation and for the modulation of functional capacities. Here we report a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) obtained from a highly homozygous genotype. The draft sequence of the grapevine genome is the fourth one produced so far for flowering plants, the second for a woody species and the first for a fruit crop (cultivated for both fruit and beverage). Grapevine was selected because of its important place in the cultural heritage of humanity beginning during the Neolithic period. Several large expansions of gene families with roles in aromatic features are observed. The grapevine genome has not undergone recent genome duplication, thus enabling the discovery of ancestral traits and features of the genetic organization of flowering plants. This analysis reveals the contribution of three ancestral genomes to the grapevine haploid content. This ancestral arrangement is common to many dicotyledonous plants but is absent from the genome of rice, which is a monocotyledon. Furthermore, we explain the chronology of previously described whole-genome duplication events in the evolution of flowering plants.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The significance of responses of the genome to challenge.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Retrotransposon-induced mutations in grape skin color.

               S. Kobayashi (2004)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Exp Bot
                J. Exp. Bot
                jexbot
                jexbot
                Journal of Experimental Botany
                Oxford University Press (UK )
                0022-0957
                1460-2431
                November 2012
                23 October 2012
                23 October 2012
                : 63
                : 18
                : 6359-6369
                Affiliations
                1Research and Innovation Centre , Fondazione Edmund Mach , via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele a/Adige (TN), Italy
                2Consulting and Services Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach , via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele a/Adige (TN), Italy
                Author notes
                * To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: silvia.vezzulli@ 123456fmach.it
                Article
                10.1093/jxb/ers290
                3504490
                23095995
                © 2012 The Author(s).

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercila License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Pages: 11
                Categories
                Research Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article