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      A Perspective on the Application of Spatially Resolved ARPES for 2D Materials

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          Abstract

          In this paper, a perspective on the application of Spatially- and Angle-Resolved PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (ARPES) for the study of two-dimensional (2D) materials is presented. ARPES allows the direct measurement of the electronic band structure of materials generating extremely useful insights into their electronic properties. The possibility to apply this technique to 2D materials is of paramount importance because these ultrathin layers are considered fundamental for future electronic, photonic and spintronic devices. In this review an overview of the technical aspects of spatially localized ARPES is given along with a description of the most advanced setups for laboratory and synchrotron-based equipment. This technique is sensitive to the lateral dimensions of the sample. Therefore, a discussion on the preparation methods of 2D material is presented. Some of the most interesting results obtained by ARPES are reported in three sections including: graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) and 2D heterostructures. Graphene has played a key role in ARPES studies because it inspired the use of this technique with other 2D materials. TMDCs are presented for their peculiar transport, optical and spin properties. Finally, the section featuring heterostructures highlights a future direction for research into 2D material structures.

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          Electric Field Effect in Atomically Thin Carbon Films

          We report a naturally-occurring two-dimensional material (graphene that can be viewed as a gigantic flat fullerene molecule, describe its electronic properties and demonstrate all-metallic field-effect transistor, which uniquely exhibits ballistic transport at submicron distances even at room temperature.
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            The rise of graphene

            Graphene is a rapidly rising star on the horizon of materials science and condensed matter physics. This strictly two-dimensional material exhibits exceptionally high crystal and electronic quality and, despite its short history, has already revealed a cornucopia of new physics and potential applications, which are briefly discussed here. Whereas one can be certain of the realness of applications only when commercial products appear, graphene no longer requires any further proof of its importance in terms of fundamental physics. Owing to its unusual electronic spectrum, graphene has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of 'relativistic' condensed matter physics, where quantum relativistic phenomena, some of which are unobservable in high energy physics, can now be mimicked and tested in table-top experiments. More generally, graphene represents a conceptually new class of materials that are only one atom thick and, on this basis, offers new inroads into low-dimensional physics that has never ceased to surprise and continues to provide a fertile ground for applications.
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              Electronics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

              The remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, two-dimensional materials with unique electronic and optical attributes. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into two-dimensional layers of single unit cell thickness. Although TMDCs have been studied for decades, recent advances in nanoscale materials characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities for two-dimensional layers of thin TMDCs in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. TMDCs such as MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2) and WSe(2) have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices. We review the historical development of TMDCs, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nanomaterials (Basel)
                Nanomaterials (Basel)
                nanomaterials
                Nanomaterials
                MDPI
                2079-4991
                27 April 2018
                May 2018
                : 8
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, UK; Neil.Fox@bristol.ac.uk
                [2 ]H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL, UK
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: mattia.cattelan@ 123456bristol.ac.uk ; Tel.: +44-117-3940004
                nanomaterials-08-00284
                10.3390/nano8050284
                5977298
                29702567
                © 2018 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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