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      Experimental Realization of Two-Dimensional Boron Sheets

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          Abstract

          Boron is the fifth element in the periodic table and possesses rich chemistry second only to carbon. A striking feature of boron is that B12 icosahedral cages occur as the building blocks in bulk boron and many boron compounds. This is in contrast to its neighboring element, carbon, which prefers 2D layered structure (graphite) in its bulk form. On the other hand, boron clusters of medium size have been predicted to be planar or quasi-planar, such as B12+ , B13+, B19-, B36, and so on. This is also in contrast to carbon clusters which exhibit various cage structures (fullerenes). Therefore, boron and carbon can be viewed as a set of complementary chemical systems in their bulk and cluster structures. Now, with the boom of graphene, an intriguing question is that whether boron can also form a monoatomic-layer 2D sheet structure? Here, we report the first successful experimental realization of 2D boron sheets. We have revealed two types of boron sheet structures, corresponding to a triangular boron lattice with different arrangements of the hexagonal holes. Moreover, our boron sheets were found to be relatively stable against oxidization, and interacts only weekly with the substrate. The realization of such a long expected 2D boron sheet could open a door toward boron electronics, in analogous to the carbon electronics based on graphene.

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          Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

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            Efficient iterative schemes forab initiototal-energy calculations using a plane-wave basis set

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              The rise of graphene

              Graphene is a rapidly rising star on the horizon of materials science and condensed matter physics. This strictly two-dimensional material exhibits exceptionally high crystal and electronic quality and, despite its short history, has already revealed a cornucopia of new physics and potential applications, which are briefly discussed here. Whereas one can be certain of the realness of applications only when commercial products appear, graphene no longer requires any further proof of its importance in terms of fundamental physics. Owing to its unusual electronic spectrum, graphene has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of 'relativistic' condensed matter physics, where quantum relativistic phenomena, some of which are unobservable in high energy physics, can now be mimicked and tested in table-top experiments. More generally, graphene represents a conceptually new class of materials that are only one atom thick and, on this basis, offers new inroads into low-dimensional physics that has never ceased to surprise and continues to provide a fertile ground for applications.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2015-12-15
                Article
                10.1038/nchem.2491
                27219700
                1512.05029
                53e7dff9-9830-41a4-bdea-02fe6996bc57

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                4 figures
                cond-mat.mes-hall cond-mat.mtrl-sci

                Condensed matter, Nanophysics

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