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      Plasma Leptin Levels Are Pulsatile in Adult Rats: Effects of Gonadectomy

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          Abstract

          Leptin, primarily secreted by adipocytes, is a peripheral hormonal signal involved in the hypothalamic integration of energy homeostasis. We report that plasma leptin levels fluctuated in a pulsatile fashion in gonad-intact adult female and male rats. Whereas in male rats leptin was secreted in the form of low-amplitude, high-frequency pulses, in female rats high-amplitude pulses were secreted at only a slightly lower frequency. Consequently, plasma leptin concentrations were higher in female than in male rats. Gonadectomy decreased leptin secretion but the sexually dimorphic leptin pulsatility pattern persisted. These results show that there is a distinct female-type and male-type leptin pulsatility pattern and each is amenable to augmentation by gonadal steroids either involving mechanisms that impart leptin pulsatility patterns directly at the level of adipocytes and/or at hypothalamic target sites.

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          Most cited references 10

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          The stomach is a source of leptin.

          The circulating peptide leptin, which is the product of the ob gene, provides feedback information on the size of fat stores to central Ob receptors that control food intake and body-weight homeostasis. Leptin has so far been reported to be secreted only by adipocytes and the placenta. Here we show that leptin messenger RNA and leptin protein are present in rat gastric epithelium, and that cells in the glands of the gastric fundic mucosa are immunoreactive for leptin. The physiological function of this previously unsuspected source of leptin is unknown. However, both feeding and administration of CCK-8 (the biologically active carboxy-terminal end of cholecystokinin) result in a rapid and large decrease in both leptin cell immunoreactivity and the leptin content of the fundic epithelium, with a concomitant increase in the concentration of leptin in the plasma. These results indicate that gastric leptin may be involved in early CCK-mediated effects activated by food intake, possibly including satiety.
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            Interacting Appetite-Regulating Pathways in the Hypothalamic Regulation of Body Weight

             S P Kalra (1999)
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              Decreased cerebrospinal-fluid/serum leptin ratio in obesity: a possible mechanism for leptin resistance

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEN
                Neuroendocrinology
                10.1159/issn.0028-3835
                Neuroendocrinology
                S. Karger AG
                0028-3835
                1423-0194
                2002
                April 2002
                17 April 2002
                : 75
                : 4
                : 257-263
                Affiliations
                Departments of aNeuroscience and bPhysiology and Functional Genomics, College of Medicine, University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, Fla., USA
                Article
                54717 Neuroendocrinology 2002;75:257–263
                10.1159/000054717
                11979056
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, References: 63, Pages: 7
                Categories
                Leptin and Food Intake Behaviour

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