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      Cucumber performance is improved by inoculation with plant growth-promoting microorganisms

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          Most cited references33

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          The enhancement of plant growth by free-living bacteria

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            How rhizobial symbionts invade plants: the Sinorhizobium-Medicago model.

            Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants have evolved complex signal exchange mechanisms that allow a specific bacterial species to induce its host plant to form invasion structures through which the bacteria can enter the plant root. Once the bacteria have been endocytosed within a host-membrane-bound compartment by root cells, the bacteria differentiate into a new form that can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Bacterial differentiation and nitrogen fixation are dependent on the microaerobic environment and other support factors provided by the plant. In return, the plant receives nitrogen from the bacteria, which allows it to grow in the absence of an external nitrogen source. Here, we review recent discoveries about the mutual recognition process that allows the model rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti to invade and differentiate inside its host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and the model host plant barrel medic (Medicago truncatula).
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              Gibberellin metabolism and its regulation.

              Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) are diterpene plant hormones that are biosynthesized through complex pathways and control diverse aspects of growth and development. Biochemical, genetic, and genomic approaches have led to the identification of the majority of the genes that encode GA biosynthesis and deactivation enzymes. Recent studies have highlighted the occurrence of previously unrecognized deactivation mechanisms. It is now clear that both GA biosynthesis and deactivation pathways are tightly regulated by developmental, hormonal, and environmental signals, consistent with the role of GAs as key growth regulators. In some cases, the molecular mechanisms for fine-tuning the hormone levels are beginning to be uncovered. In this review, I summarize our current understanding of the GA biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in plants and fungi, and discuss how GA concentrations in plant tissues are regulated during development and in response to environmental stimuli.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B — Soil & Plant Science
                Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B — Soil & Plant Science
                Informa UK Limited
                0906-4710
                1651-1913
                September 17 2014
                January 02 2015
                October 03 2014
                January 02 2015
                : 65
                : 1
                : 36-44
                Article
                10.1080/09064710.2014.960889
                54cd82d2-f6a8-4453-be01-37556ce491c3
                © 2015
                History

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