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      Parental influence on eating behavior: conception to adolescence.

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          Abstract

          The first years of life mark a time of rapid development and dietary change, as children transition from an exclusive milk diet to a modified adult diet. During these early years, children's learning about food and eating plays a central role in shaping subsequent food choices, diet quality, and weight status. Parents play a powerful role in children's eating behavior, providing both genes and environment for children. For example, they influence children's developing preferences and eating behaviors by making some foods available rather than others, and by acting as models of eating behavior. In addition, parents use feeding practices, which have evolved over thousands of years, to promote patterns of food intake necessary for children's growth and health. However in current eating environments, characterized by too much inexpensive palatable, energy dense food, these traditional feeding practices can promote overeating and weight gain. To meet the challenge of promoting healthy weight in children in the current eating environment, parents need guidance regarding alternatives to traditional feeding practices.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Law Med Ethics
          The Journal of law, medicine & ethics : a journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics
          Wiley
          1073-1105
          1073-1105
          2007
          : 35
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Center for Childhood Obesity Research, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
          Article
          JLME111 NIHMS62783
          10.1111/j.1748-720X.2007.00111.x
          2531152
          17341215
          54fc6205-829a-4639-8528-a85c5b322510
          History

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