4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Relationship between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and severe acute pancreatitis (“the lipid paradox”)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background and aim

          The aim of this study was to investigate the association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and the development of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).

          Patients and methods

          A total of 674 patients with acute pancreatitis were enrolled. Non-linearity in the relationship between LDL-C and SAP was assessed by restricted cubic spline analysis. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to identify independent risk factors of SAP.

          Results

          The restricted cubic spline analysis suggested a nonlinear association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C and triglyceride levels and incidence of SAP. The incidence of SAP in patients with low LDL-C (<90 mg/dL), moderate LDL-C (90–150 mg/dL) and high LDL-C (>150 mg/dL) levels was 15.1%, 3.7% and 9.8%, respectively. Multivariable analysis confirmed that low LDL-C levels (odds ratio [OR] 3.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35–6.90), high LDL-C levels (OR 4.42; 95% CI 1.41–13.87) and low HDL-C levels (OR 6.90; 95% CI 2.61–18.23) but not high triglyceride levels (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.40–2.72) were associated with the development of SAP.

          Conclusion

          Both low LDL-C (<90 mg/dL) and high LDL-C (>150 mg/dL) levels within 24 hours from admission are independently associated with an increased risk of SAP.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A Wilcoxon-type test for trend.

           J Cuzick (2015)
          An extension of the Wilcoxon rank-sum test is developed to handle the situation in which a variable is measured for individuals in three or more (ordered) groups and a non-parametric test for trend across these groups is desired. The uses of the test are illustrated by two examples from cancer research.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Fasting time and lipid levels in a community-based population: a cross-sectional study.

            Although current guidelines recommend measuring lipid levels in a fasting state, recent studies suggest that nonfasting lipid profiles change minimally in response to food intake and may be superior to fasting levels in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between fasting times and lipid levels. Cross-sectional examination of laboratory data, including fasting duration (in hours) and lipid results, was performed over a 6-month period in 2011 in a large community-based cohort. Data were obtained from Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, the sole supplier of laboratory services for Calgary and surrounding areas (source population, 1.4 million persons). The main outcome measures were mean levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides for fasting intervals from 1 hour to more than 16 hours. After differences in individual ages were controlled for, linear regression models were used to estimate the mean levels of cholesterol subclasses at different fasting times. A total of 209,180 individuals (111,048 females and 98,132 males) were included in the study. The mean levels of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol differed little among individuals with various fasting times. The mean calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed slightly greater variations of up to 10% among groups of patients with different fasting intervals, and the mean triglyceride levels showed variations of up to 20%. Fasting times showed little association with lipid subclass levels in a community-based population, which suggests that fasting for routine lipid levels is largely unnecessary.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Role of oxidative stress in pancreatic inflammation.

              Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Clinical and basic science studies have indicated that ROS/RNS formation processes are intimately linked to the development of the inflammatory disorders. The detrimental effects of highly reactive ROS/RNS are mediated by their direct actions on biomolecules (lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) and activation of proinflammatory signal cascades, which subsequently lead to activation of immune responses. The present article summarizes the possible sources of ROS/RNS formation and the detailed signaling cascades implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation, as observed in acute and chronic pancreatitis. A therapeutic ROS/RNS-scavenging strategy has been advocated for decades; however, clinical studies examining such approaches have been inconsistent in their results. Emerging evidence indicates that pancreatitis-inducing ROS/RNS generation may be attenuated by targeting ROS/RNS-generating enzymes and upstream mediators.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2018
                30 May 2018
                : 14
                : 981-989
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]Department of Medicine II, Saarland University Medical Center, Saarland University, Homburg, Germany
                [3 ]Department of Medicine, Marienhausklinik St Josef Kohlhof, Neunkirchen, Germany
                [4 ]Department of Surgery, World Mate Emergency Hospital, Battambang, Cambodia
                [5 ]Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, Sandro Pertini Hospital, Rome, Italy
                [6 ]Department of Surgery, Chris Hani-Baragwanath Academic Hospital, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
                [7 ]Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Wandong Hong, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Nanbaixiang, Ouhai District, Wenzhou 325000, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, Tel/fax +86 577 5557 9122, Email xhnk-hwd@ 123456163.com
                Mengtao Zhou, Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Nanbaixiang, Ouhai District, Wenzhou 325000, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, Tel +86 138 0669 7558, Fax +86 577 5557 9122, Email studyzhoumengtao@ 123456sina.com
                [*]

                These authors contributed equally to this work

                Article
                tcrm-14-981
                10.2147/TCRM.S159387
                5985770
                © 2018 Hong et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article