1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The normal width of the linea alba in nulliparous women.

      Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.y.)

      Abdominal Muscles, anatomy & histology, ultrasonography, Abdominal Wall, Adult, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Parity, Pregnancy, Reference Values, Skin Pigmentation, Umbilicus, Young Adult

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The function of the linea alba is to maintain the abdominal muscles at a certain proximity to each other. In the case of long-lasting increased intra-abdominal pressure, the linea alba widens. Yet, as the existence of the linea a priori implicates a physiological distance between the two rectus muscles, the question arises as to what the normal width of the linea alba is. To evaluate the normal width of the linea alba, we examined 150 nulliparous women between 20 and 45 years of age with a body mass index < 30 kg m(-2) by ultrasound at three reference points: the origin at the xiphoid and 3 cm above and 2 cm below the umbilicus. The examination revealed a broad range of widths at the three reference points. The linea was widest at 3 cm above the umbilicus (-35 mm), followed by the reference point 2 cm below the umbilicus (-31 mm) and the origin at the xiphoid (-31 mm). The mean width was 7 +/- 5 mm at the xiphoid and 13 +/- 7 mm above and 8 +/- 6 mm below the umbilicus. For the definition of the normal width of the linea, the 10th and 90th percentiles were taken. The linea alba can be considered "normal" up to a width of 15 mm at the xiphoid, up to 22 mm at the reference point 3 cm above the umbilicus and up to 16 mm at the reference point 2 cm below the umbilicus in nulliparous women.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          19637295
          10.1002/ca.20836

          Comments

          Comment on this article