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      I-Mutant2.0: predicting stability changes upon mutation from the protein sequence or structure

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      , , *
      Nucleic Acids Research
      Oxford University Press

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          Abstract

          I-Mutant2.0 is a support vector machine (SVM)-based tool for the automatic prediction of protein stability changes upon single point mutations. I-Mutant2.0 predictions are performed starting either from the protein structure or, more importantly, from the protein sequence. This latter task, to the best of our knowledge, is exploited for the first time. The method was trained and tested on a data set derived from ProTherm, which is presently the most comprehensive available database of thermodynamic experimental data of free energy changes of protein stability upon mutation under different conditions. I-Mutant2.0 can be used both as a classifier for predicting the sign of the protein stability change upon mutation and as a regression estimator for predicting the related ΔΔ G values. Acting as a classifier, I-Mutant2.0 correctly predicts (with a cross-validation procedure) 80% or 77% of the data set, depending on the usage of structural or sequence information, respectively. When predicting ΔΔ G values associated with mutations, the correlation of predicted with expected/experimental values is 0.71 (with a standard error of 1.30 kcal/mol) and 0.62 (with a standard error of 1.45 kcal/mol) when structural or sequence information are respectively adopted. Our web interface allows the selection of a predictive mode that depends on the availability of the protein structure and/or sequence. In this latter case, the web server requires only pasting of a protein sequence in a raw format. We therefore introduce I-Mutant2.0 as a unique and valuable helper for protein design, even when the protein structure is not yet known with atomic resolution. Availability: http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/cgi/predictors/I-Mutant2.0/I-Mutant2.0.cgi.

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          Most cited references7

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          Distance-scaled, finite ideal-gas reference state improves structure-derived potentials of mean force for structure selection and stability prediction.

          The distance-dependent structure-derived potentials developed so far all employed a reference state that can be characterized as a residue (atom)-averaged state. Here, we establish a new reference state called the distance-scaled, finite ideal-gas reference (DFIRE) state. The reference state is used to construct a residue-specific all-atom potential of mean force from a database of 1011 nonhomologous (less than 30% homology) protein structures with resolution less than 2 A. The new all-atom potential recognizes more native proteins from 32 multiple decoy sets, and raises an average Z-score by 1.4 units more than two previously developed, residue-specific, all-atom knowledge-based potentials. When only backbone and C(beta) atoms are used in scoring, the performance of the DFIRE-based potential, although is worse than that of the all-atom version, is comparable to those of the previously developed potentials on the all-atom level. In addition, the DFIRE-based all-atom potential provides the most accurate prediction of the stabilities of 895 mutants among three knowledge-based all-atom potentials. Comparison with several physical-based potentials is made.
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            ProTherm, version 4.0: thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants.

            Release 4.0 of ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants, contains approximately 14,500 numerical data (approximately 450% of the first version) of several thermodynamic parameters along with experimental methods and conditions, and structural, functional and literature information. The sequence and structural information of proteins is connected with thermodynamic data through links between entries in Protein Data Bank, Protein Information Resource and SWISS-PROT and the data in ProTherm. We have separated the Gibbs free energy change obtained at extrapolated temperature from the data on denaturation temperature measured by the thermal denaturation method. We have added the statistics of amino acid replacements and links to homologous structures to each protein. Further, we have improved the search and display options to enhance search capability through the web interface. ProTherm is freely available at http://gibk26. bse.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html.
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              A neural-network-based method for predicting protein stability changes upon single point mutations.

              One important requirement for protein design is to be able to predict changes of protein stability upon mutation. Different methods addressing this task have been described and their performance tested considering global linear correlation between predicted and experimental data. Neither is direct statistical evaluation of their prediction performance available, nor is a direct comparison among different approaches possible. Recently, a significant database of thermodynamic data on protein stability changes upon single point mutation has been generated (ProTherm). This allows the application of machine learning techniques to predicting free energy stability changes upon mutation starting from the protein sequence. In this paper, we present a neural-network-based method to predict if a given mutation increases or decreases the protein thermodynamic stability with respect to the native structure. Using a dataset consisting of 1615 mutations, our predictor correctly classifies >80% of the mutations in the database. On the same task and using the same data, our predictor performs better than other methods available on the Web. Moreover, when our system is coupled with energy-based methods, the joint prediction accuracy increases up to 90%, suggesting that it can be used to increase also the performance of pre-existing methods, and generally to improve protein design strategies. The server is under construction and will be available at http://www.biocomp.unibo.it
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                01 July 2005
                01 July 2005
                27 June 2005
                : 33
                : Web Server issue
                : W306-W310
                Affiliations
                Laboratory of Biocomputing, CIRB/Department of Biology, University of Bologna via Irnerio 42, 40126 Bologna, Italy
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +39 051 2094005; Fax: +39 051 242576; Email: casadio@ 123456alma.unibo.it
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gki375
                1160136
                15980478
                5588cb1c-64d2-45d7-a91e-9c3abfb4e7c9
                © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

                The online version of this article has been published under an open access model. Users are entitled to use, reproduce, disseminate, or display the open access version of this article for non-commercial purposes provided that: the original authorship is properly and fully attributed; the Journal and Oxford University Press are attributed as the original place of publication with the correct citation details given; if an article is subsequently reproduced or disseminated not in its entirety but only in part or as a derivative work this must be clearly indicated. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@ 123456oupjournals.org

                History
                : 11 February 2005
                : 07 March 2005
                : 07 March 2005
                Categories
                Article

                Genetics
                Genetics

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