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      GUP1 and its close homologue GUP2, encoding multimembrane-spanning proteins involved in active glycerol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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      Molecular Microbiology

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          Many yeast species can utilize glycerol, both as a sole carbon source and as an osmolyte. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, physiological studies have previously shown the presence of an active uptake system driven by electrogenic proton symport. We have used transposon mutagenesis to isolate mutants affected in the transport of glycerol into the cell. Here we present the identification of YGL084c, encoding a multimembrane-spanning protein, as being essential for proton symport of glycerol into S. cerevisiae. The gene is named GUP1 (glycerol uptake) and, for growth on glycerol, is important as a carbon and energy source. In addition, in strains deficient in glycerol production it also provides osmotic protection by the addition of glycerol. Another open reading frame (ORF), YPL189w, presenting a high degree of homology to YGL084c, similarly appears to be involved in active glycerol uptake in salt-containing glucose-based media in strains deficient in glycerol production. Analogously, this gene is named GUP2. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a gene product involved in active transport of glycerol in yeasts. Mutations with the same phenotypes occurred in two other ORFs of previously unknown function, YDL074c and YPL180w.

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          Most cited references 32

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          Multifunctional yeast high-copy-number shuttle vectors.

          A set of four yeast shuttle vectors that incorporate sequences from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 mu endogenous plasmid has been constructed. These yeast episomal plasmid (YEp)-type vectors (pRS420 series) differ only in their yeast selectable markers, HIS3, TRP1, LEU2 or URA3. The pRS420 plasmids are based on the backbone of a multifunctional phagemid, pBluescript II SK+, and share its useful properties for growth in Escherichia coli and manipulation in vitro. The pRS420 plasmids have a copy number of about 20 per cell, equivalent to that of YEp24. During non-selective yeast growth, pRS420 plasmids are lost through mitotic segregation at rates similar to other YEp vectors and yeast centromeric plasmid (YCp) vectors, in the range of 1.5-5% of progeny per doubling. The pRS420 series provides high-copy-number counterparts to the current pRS vectors [Sikorski and Hieter, Genetics 122 (1989) 19-27].
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            New heterologous modules for classical or PCR-based gene disruptions inSaccharomyces cerevisiae

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              PCR-synthesis of marker cassettes with long flanking homology regions for gene disruptions in S. cerevisiae.

               Paul Wach (1996)
              A PCR-method for fast production of disruption cassettes is introduced, that allows the addition of long flanking homology regions of several hundred base pairs (LFH-PCR) to a marker module. Such a disruption cassette was made by linking two PCR fragments produced from genomic DNA to kanMX6, a modification of dominant resistance marker making S. cerevisiae resistant to geneticin (G418). In a first step, two several hundred base pairs long DNA fragments from the 5'- and 3'- region of a S. cerevisiae gene were amplified in such a way that 26 base pairs extensions homologous to the kanMX6 marker were added to one of their end. In a second step, one strand of each of these molecules then served as a long primer in a PCR using kanMX6 as template. When such a LFH-PCR-generated disruption cassette was used instead of a PCR-made disruption cassette flanked by short homology regions, transformation efficiencies were increased by at least a factor of thirty. This modification will therefore also help to apply PCR-mediated gene manipulations to strains with decreased transformability and/or unpredictable sequence deviations.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Molecular Microbiology
                Mol Microbiol
                Wiley
                0950-382X
                1365-2958
                July 2000
                July 2000
                : 37
                : 1
                : 108-124
                Article
                10.1046/j.1365-2958.2000.01968.x
                10931309
                © 2000

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