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      The Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS): some psychometric properties.

      Cyberpsychology & behavior : the impact of the Internet, multimedia and virtual reality on behavior and society

      Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Attitude to Computers, Behavior, Addictive, classification, diagnosis, psychology, Child, Compulsive Behavior, Female, Humans, Young Adult, Internet, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Psychological Tests, Psychometrics, methods, Reproducibility of Results, Severity of Illness Index, User-Computer Interface, Adolescent

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          Abstract

          The present study aimed to develop a short, easily administered, psychometrically sound, and valid instrument to assess the severity of compulsive Internet use. A set of criteria was determined based on the addiction literature. Next, the internal consistency and convergent validity were determined, and the set was tested as a one-factor solution in two representative samples of heavy Internet users (n = 447 and n = 229) and in one large convenience sample of regular Internet users (n = 16,925). In these three studies, respondents were asked about their online behavior and about problems related to Internet use. In the first study, the Online Cognition Scale (OCS) was included to determine concurrent validity. The newly developed Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS) contains 14 items ratable on a 5-point Likert scale. The instrument showed good factorial stability across time and across different samples and subsamples. The internal consistency is high, and high correlations with concurrent and criterion variables demonstrate good validity.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Issues for DSM-V: internet addiction.

           Torin Block (2008)
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            Addiction.

            The development of addiction involves a transition from casual to compulsive patterns of drug use. This transition to addiction is accompanied by many drug-induced changes in the brain and associated changes in psychological functions. In this article we present a critical analysis of the major theoretical explanations of how drug-induced alterations in psychological function might cause a transition to addiction. These include: (a) the traditional hedonic view that drug pleasure and subsequent unpleasant withdrawal symptoms are the chief causes of addiction; (b) the view that addiction is due to aberrant learning, especially the development of strong stimulus-response habits; (c) our incentive-sensitization view, which suggests that sensitization of a neural system that attributes incentive salience causes compulsive motivation or "wanting" to take addictive drugs; and (d) the idea that dysfunction of frontal cortical systems, which normally regulate decision making and inhibitory control over behavior, leads to impaired judgment and impulsivity in addicts.
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              Psychology of computer use: XL. Addictive use of the Internet: a case that breaks the stereotype.

               Sarah Young (1996)
              This case involves a homemaker 43 years of age who is addicted to using the Internet. This case was selected as it demonstrates that a nontechnologically oriented woman with a reportedly content home life and no prior addiction or psychiatric history abused the Internet which resulted in significant impairment to her family life. This paper defines addictive use of the Internet, outlines the subject's progression of addictive on-line use, and discusses the implications of such addictive behavior on the new market of Internet consumers.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                19072079
                10.1089/cpb.2008.0181

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