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      Associations of Depressive Symptoms and Pain with Dialysis Adherence, Health Resource Utilization, and Mortality in Patients Receiving Chronic Hemodialysis

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          Abstract

          Depressive symptoms and pain are common in patients receiving chronic hemodialysis, yet their effect on dialysis adherence, health resource utilization, and mortality is not fully understood. This study sought to characterize the longitudinal associations of these symptoms with dialysis adherence, emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and mortality.

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          Most cited references 25

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          Psychosocial factors in dialysis patients.

           Paul L Kimmel (2001)
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            Depression is an important contributor to low medication adherence in hemodialyzed patients and transplant recipients.

            End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a growing public health concern and non-adherence to treatment has been associated with poorer health outcomes in this population. Depression, likely to be the most common psychopathology in such patients, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We compared psychological measures and self-reported medication adherence of 94 kidney transplant recipients to those of 65 patients receiving hemodialysis in a major medical center in Brooklyn, New York. Compared to the transplant group, the hemodialysis cohort was significantly more depressed as determined by the Beck Depression Inventory score. They also had a significantly lower adherence to medication as reported on the Medication Therapy Adherence Scale. Using hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the variance in depression was the only statistically significant predictor of medication adherence beyond gender and mode of treatment, accounting for an additional 12% of the variance. Our study strongly suggests that a depressive affect is an important contributor to low medication adherence in patients with ESRD on hemodialysis or kidney transplant recipients.
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              Prevalence, severity, and importance of physical and emotional symptoms in chronic hemodialysis patients.

              The prevalence, severity, and clinical significance of physical and emotional symptoms in patients who are on maintenance hemodialysis remain incompletely characterized. This study sought to assess symptoms and their relationship to quality of life and depression. The recently developed Dialysis Symptom Index was used to assess the presence and the severity of 30 symptoms. The Illness Effects Questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory were used to evaluate quality of life and depression, respectively. Correlations among symptom burden, symptom severity, quality of life, and depression were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficient. A total of 162 patients from three dialysis units were enrolled. Mean age was 62 y, 48% were black, 62% were men, and 48% had diabetes. The median number of symptoms was 9.0 (interquartile range 6 to 13). Dry skin, fatigue, itching, and bone/joint pain each were reported by > or =50% of patients. Seven additional symptoms were reported by >33% of patients. Sixteen individual symptoms were described as being more than "somewhat bothersome." Overall symptom burden and severity each were correlated directly with impaired quality of life and depression. In multivariable analyses adjusting for demographic and clinical variables including depression, associations between symptoms and quality of life remained robust. Physical and emotional symptoms are prevalent, can be severe, and are correlated directly with impaired quality of life and depression in maintenance hemodialysis patients. Incorporating a standard assessment of symptoms into the care provided to maintenance hemodialysis patients may provide a means to improve quality of life in this patient population.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
                CJASN
                American Society of Nephrology (ASN)
                1555-9041
                1555-905X
                September 05 2014
                September 05 2014
                September 05 2014
                July 31 2014
                : 9
                : 9
                : 1594-1602
                Article
                10.2215/CJN.00220114
                25081360
                © 2014

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