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Nonribosomal Peptide Synthesis-Principles and Prospects.

Angewandte Chemie (International Ed. in English)

Wiley

antibiotics, drug design, enzymes, nonribosomal peptides, biosynthesis

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      Abstract

      Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are large multienzyme machineries that assemble numerous peptides with large structural and functional diversity. These peptides include more than 20 marketed drugs, such as antibacterials (penicillin, vancomycin), antitumor compounds (bleomycin), and immunosuppressants (cyclosporine). Over the past few decades biochemical and structural biology studies have gained mechanistic insights into the highly complex assembly line of nonribosomal peptides. This Review provides state-of-the-art knowledge on the underlying mechanisms of NRPSs and the variety of their products along with detailed analysis of the challenges for future reprogrammed biosynthesis. Such a reprogramming of NRPSs would immediately spur chances to generate analogues of existing drugs or new compound libraries of otherwise nearly inaccessible compound structures.

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      Most cited references 441

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      Chromatin modifications and their function.

      The surface of nucleosomes is studded with a multiplicity of modifications. At least eight different classes have been characterized to date and many different sites have been identified for each class. Operationally, modifications function either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by affecting the recruitment of nonhistone proteins to chromatin. Their presence on histones can dictate the higher-order chromatin structure in which DNA is packaged and can orchestrate the ordered recruitment of enzyme complexes to manipulate DNA. In this way, histone modifications have the potential to influence many fundamental biological processes, some of which may be epigenetically inherited.
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        The ubiquitin system.

        The selective degradation of many short-lived proteins in eukaryotic cells is carried out by the ubiquitin system. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by covalent ligation to ubiquitin, a highly conserved small protein. Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of regulatory proteins plays important roles in the control of numerous processes, including cell-cycle progression, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, receptor down-regulation, and endocytosis. The ubiquitin system has been implicated in the immune response, development, and programmed cell death. Abnormalities in ubiquitin-mediated processes have been shown to cause pathological conditions, including malignant transformation. In this review we discuss recent information on functions and mechanisms of the ubiquitin system. Since the selectivity of protein degradation is determined mainly at the stage of ligation to ubiquitin, special attention is focused on what we know, and would like to know, about the mode of action of ubiquitin-protein ligation systems and about signals in proteins recognized by these systems.
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          antiSMASH 3.0—a comprehensive resource for the genome mining of biosynthetic gene clusters

          Microbial secondary metabolism constitutes a rich source of antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, insecticides and other high-value chemicals. Genome mining of gene clusters that encode the biosynthetic pathways for these metabolites has become a key methodology for novel compound discovery. In 2011, we introduced antiSMASH, a web server and stand-alone tool for the automatic genomic identification and analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters, available at http://antismash.secondarymetabolites.org. Here, we present version 3.0 of antiSMASH, which has undergone major improvements. A full integration of the recently published ClusterFinder algorithm now allows using this probabilistic algorithm to detect putative gene clusters of unknown types. Also, a new dereplication variant of the ClusterBlast module now identifies similarities of identified clusters to any of 1172 clusters with known end products. At the enzyme level, active sites of key biosynthetic enzymes are now pinpointed through a curated pattern-matching procedure and Enzyme Commission numbers are assigned to functionally classify all enzyme-coding genes. Additionally, chemical structure prediction has been improved by incorporating polyketide reduction states. Finally, in order for users to be able to organize and analyze multiple antiSMASH outputs in a private setting, a new XML output module allows offline editing of antiSMASH annotations within the Geneious software.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            10.1002/anie.201609079
            28323366

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