7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve reduces neuropathic pain in patients with polyneuropathy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) is caused by neuronal damage to the peripheral nervous system and usually affects the distal extremities. This open-label study examined the effect of short-term peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) on individuals with PNP due to polyneuropathy. A total of 12 patients (mean age, 63.0 ± 10.0 years, 41.7% male) with daily bilateral PNP for at least 6 months (mean duration, 7.4 ± 7.8 years) received a total of six direct electrical stimulation therapies to the posterior tibial nerve at 3–4-day intervals. Eight patients completed the study and were included in the efficacy analysis. The average pain at baseline was 36.6 ± 3.80 estimated by the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. After the last stimulation, pain was significantly reduced by 85.5% to 4.88 ± 3.1 ( p = 0.008). Six patients (75%) had over 50% decrease in pain after the first stimulation therapy and 99.2% after the final stimulation therapy. The patients also reported statistically significant decreases in pain level (measured by visual analog scale), ranging from 54.85% to 87.50% after each of the stimulations as compared to the pain experienced prior to the stimulations. The procedure was safe without any serious adverse events. PNS has demonstrated excellent efficacy and improvement of PNP symptoms. Further studies in larger patient populations are warranted.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire.

           R Melzack (1987)
          A short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) has been developed. The main component of the SF-MPQ consists of 15 descriptors (11 sensory; 4 affective) which are rated on an intensity scale as 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate or 3 = severe. Three pain scores are derived from the sum of the intensity rank values of the words chosen for sensory, affective and total descriptors. The SF-MPQ also includes the Present Pain Intensity (PPI) index of the standard MPQ and a visual analogue scale (VAS). The SF-MPQ scores obtained from patients in post-surgical and obstetrical wards and physiotherapy and dental departments were compared to the scores obtained with the standard MPQ. The correlations were consistently high and significant. The SF-MPQ was also shown to be sufficiently sensitive to demonstrate differences due to treatment at statistical levels comparable to those obtained with the standard form. The SF-MPQ shows promise as a useful tool in situations in which the standard MPQ takes too long to administer, yet qualitative information is desired and the PPI and VAS are inadequate.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Temporary abolition of pain in man.

             P. Wall,  D Sweet (1967)
            In eight patients with intense chronic cutaneous pain, sensory nerves or roots. supplying the painful area were stimulated. Square-wave 0.1-millisecond pulses at 100 cycles per second were applied, and the voltage was raised until the patient reported tingling in the area. During this stimulation, pressure on previously sensitive areas failed to evoke pain. Four patients, who had diseases of their peripheral nerves, experienced relief of their pain for more than half an hour after stimulation for 2 minutes.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Percutaneous afferent neuromodulation for the refractory overactive bladder: results of a multicenter study.

              More than 20 million Americans have an overactive bladder, the predominant symptoms being frequency, urgency, urge incontinence and pelvic pain. While the etiology is not completely understood, most investigators believe the causes to be many and the pelvic floor to be intimately related. Whatever the etiology, traditional therapies, including dietary manipulation, bladder drill, medications and physical therapy, are often poorly tolerated and/or ineffective. We report a prospective, multicenter clinical trial that was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of percutaneous peripheral afferent nerve stimulation for treatment of refractive overactive bladder and/or pelvic floor dysfunction. A total of 53 patients with overactive bladders, in whom all traditional therapy failed, were enrolled in 1 of 5 sites within the United States. Patients received weekly percutaneous electrical stimulations via a 34 gauge needle placed near the tibial nerve 3 finger breadths above the ankle. Urodynamic studies, detailed voiding diaries, quality of life surveys, and incontinence impact questionnaires were completed before, during and after the study. Of the patients with a mean age of 57.4 years 89% (47 of 53) completed the 12-week study. A total of 71% of patients were classified as treatment successes by the investigators and were started on long-term treatment. On average patients noticed a 25% reduction in mean daytime and 21% reduction in mean nighttime voiding frequencies (p <0.05). Urge incontinence was reduced by an average of 35% (p <0.05). Statistically significant improvements were noted in selective pain and quality of life indexes. No significant adverse events related to treatment were noted in any patients. Percutaneous peripheral afferent nerve stimulation offers a safe, minimally invasive and effective treatment for managing refractive overactive bladder and/or pelvic floor dysfunction.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2017
                29 November 2017
                : 10
                : 2717-2723
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Neurology, Wolfson Medical Center, Holon
                [2 ]Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Ron Dabby, Department of Neurology, Wolfson Medical Center, 62 Halochamim Street, Holon 58100, Israel, Tel +972 3 502 8513, Fax +972 3 502 8827, Email dabbyr@ 123456netvision.net.il
                Article
                jpr-10-2717
                10.2147/JPR.S137420
                5716322
                © 2017 Dabby et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article