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      Erratum to: Investigating determinants of catastrophic health spending among poorly insured elderly households in urban Nigeria

      International Journal for Equity in Health

      BioMed Central

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          Abstract

          The original version of this article [1] unfortunately contained a mistake. In the subsection titled “Implications for policy” part of the text was incorrect. It read “One good example is Ghana, which has now achieved 54 % comprehensive health coverage of its population, and only 2 esources are shared by the family to meet the needs of elderly members [68, 69].” The corrected text can be found below: “One good example is Ghana, which has now achieved 54 % comprehensive health coverage of its population, and only 27 % of health spending is financed out-of-pocket [41]. Strengthen safety nets: In the Nigerian context, household resources are shared by the family to meet the needs of elderly members [67, 68].” The original article was corrected to reflect this.

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          Investigating determinants of catastrophic health spending among poorly insured elderly households in urban Nigeria

           Olumide Adisa (2015)
          Background In the absence of functional social security mechanisms for elderly people in Nigeria, elderly households are solely responsible for geriatric healthcare costs, which can lead to catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) – particularly among the poor. This study investigates the key determinants of CHE among poorly insured elderly households in Nigeria. We also offer some policy options for reducing the risk of CHE. Methods Data on out-of pocket payments and self-reported health status were sourced from the Nigerian General Household Panel Survey (NGHPS) in Nigeria, conducted by the National Bureau of Statistics in 2010, with technical support from the World Bank. CHE was defined at the 10 % of total consumption expenditure threshold. The determinants of CHE and their marginal effects were investigated using probit regressions. An elderly household is defined as a household with at least one elderly member ≥ 50 years old. Results The proportion of elderly households with CHE is 9.6 %. Poorer and smaller elderly households were most at risk of CHE. Female-headed households were less likely to incur CHE compared to male-headed households (p < 0.01). Conversely, households with informal health financing arrangements were less likely to incur CHE (p < 0.001). Education and utilising a health promoting tool, such as treated bednets increased the probability of incurring CHE in Urban Nigeria. Conclusion Findings from this paper should prompt policy action to financially support poor elderly households at risk of CHE in Urban Nigeria. The Nigerian government should enhance the national health insurance scheme to provide better coverage for elderly people, thereby protecting elderly households from incurring CHE.
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            Author and article information

            Contributors
            lqxooad@nottingham.ac.uk
            Journal
            Int J Equity Health
            Int J Equity Health
            International Journal for Equity in Health
            BioMed Central (London )
            1475-9276
            26 October 2015
            26 October 2015
            2015
            : 14
            Affiliations
            School of Sociology, and Social Policy, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham, NG7 2RD UK
            Article
            241
            10.1186/s12939-015-0241-4
            4620639
            26503100
            © Adisa. 2015

            Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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            © The Author(s) 2015

            Health & Social care

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