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      Principles for a Cultural Psychology of Creativity

      Culture & Psychology
      SAGE Publications

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          Creativity.

          Mark Runco (2003)
          Creativity has clear benefits for individuals and society as a whole. Not surprisingly, a great deal of research has focused on creativity, especially in the past 20 years. This chapter reviews the creativity research, first looking to the relevant traits, capacities, influences, and products, and then within disciplinary perspectives on creativity (e.g., biological, cognitive, developmental, organizational). Great headway is being made in creativity research, but more dialogue between perspectives is suggested. New and important areas of research are highlighted, and the various costs and benefits of creativity are discussed.
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            Cultural psychology – what is it?

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              Creative productivity, age, and stress: a biographical time-series analysis of 10 classical composers.

              The determinants of creative productivity were specified in the form of six hypotheses. Using a multivariate cross-sectional time-series design with several controls, the lives and works of 10 classical composers were analyzed into consecutive 5-year age periods. Two independent measures of productivity were operationalized (works and themes), with each measure subdivided into major and minor compositions according to a citation criterion. It was consistently found across both productivity measures that (a) quality of productivity is a probabilistic consequence of productive quantity and (b) total productivity, while affected by age and physical illness, is otherwise free of external influences (viz., social reinforcement, biographical stress, war intensity, and internal disturbances). Due to the more selective nature of the thematic productivity measure, the criterion of total themes alone was affected by competition and a time-wise bias. The article closes with a brief discussion of the broad substantive utility of the methodological design.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Culture & Psychology
                Culture & Psychology
                SAGE Publications
                1354-067X
                1461-7056
                May 25 2010
                May 25 2010
                : 16
                : 2
                : 147-163
                Article
                10.1177/1354067X10361394
                56730ac7-9bfc-4795-9045-08d22538e5d1
                © 2010

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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