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      Electric-field-induced ferromagnetic resonance excitation in an ultrathin ferromagnetic metal layer

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          Most cited references 27

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          Microwave Oscillations of a Nanomagnet Driven by a Spin-Polarized Current

          We describe direct electrical measurements of microwave-frequency dynamics in individual nanomagnets that are driven by spin transfer from a DC spin-polarized current. We map out the dynamical stability diagram as a function of current and magnetic field, and we show that spin transfer can produce several different types of magnetic excitations, including small-angle precession, a more complicated large-angle motion, and a high-current state that generates little microwave signal. The large-angle mode can produce a significant emission of microwave energy, as large as 40 times the Johnson-noise background.
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            Coherent control of a single electron spin with electric fields

            Manipulation of single spins is essential for spin-based quantum information processing. Electrical control instead of magnetic control is particularly appealing for this purpose, since electric fields are easy to generate locally on-chip. We experimentally realize coherent control of a single electron spin in a quantum dot using an oscillating electric field generated by a local gate. The electric field induces coherent transitions (Rabi oscillations) between spin-up and spin-down with pi/2 rotations as fast as ~55ns. Our analysis indicates that the electrically-induced spin transitions are mediated by the spin-orbit interaction. Taken together with the recently demonstrated coherent exchange of two neighboring spins, our results demonstrate the feasibility of fully electrical manipulation of spin qubits.
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              Spin-torque diode effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

              There is currently much interest in the development of 'spintronic' devices, in which harnessing the spins of electrons (rather than just their charges) is anticipated to provide new functionalities that go beyond those possible with conventional electronic devices. One widely studied example of an effect that has its roots in the electron's spin degree of freedom is the torque exerted by a spin-polarized electric current on the spin moment of a nanometre-scale magnet. This torque causes the magnetic moment to rotate at potentially useful frequencies. Here we report a very different phenomenon that is also based on the interplay between spin dynamics and spin-dependent transport, and which arises from unusual diode behaviour. We show that the application of a small radio-frequency alternating current to a nanometre-scale magnetic tunnel junction can generate a measurable direct-current (d.c.) voltage across the device when the frequency is resonant with the spin oscillations that arise from the spin-torque effect: at resonance (which can be tuned by an external magnetic field), the structure exhibits different resistance states depending on the direction of the current. This behaviour is markedly different from that of a conventional semiconductor diode, and could form the basis of a nanometre-scale radio-frequency detector in telecommunication circuits.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Physics
                Nat Phys
                Springer Nature
                1745-2473
                1745-2481
                April 29 2012
                April 29 2012
                : 8
                : 6
                : 492-497
                Article
                10.1038/nphys2298
                © 2012
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