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      Repellent materials. Robust self-cleaning surfaces that function when exposed to either air or oil.

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          Abstract

          Superhydrophobic self-cleaning surfaces are based on the surface micro/nanomorphologies; however, such surfaces are mechanically weak and stop functioning when exposed to oil. We have created an ethanolic suspension of perfluorosilane-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles that forms a paint that can be sprayed, dipped, or extruded onto both hard and soft materials to create a self-cleaning surface that functions even upon emersion in oil. Commercial adhesives were used to bond the paint to various substrates and promote robustness. These surfaces maintained their water repellency after finger-wipe, knife-scratch, and even 40 abrasion cycles with sandpaper. The formulations developed can be used on clothes, paper, glass, and steel for a myriad of self-cleaning applications.

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          Most cited references15

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          Designing superoleophobic surfaces.

          Understanding the complementary roles of surface energy and roughness on natural nonwetting surfaces has led to the development of a number of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces, which exhibit apparent contact angles with water greater than 150 degrees and low contact angle hysteresis. However, superoleophobic surfaces-those that display contact angles greater than 150 degrees with organic liquids having appreciably lower surface tensions than that of water-are extremely rare. Calculations suggest that creating such a surface would require a surface energy lower than that of any known material. We show how a third factor, re-entrant surface curvature, in conjunction with chemical composition and roughened texture, can be used to design surfaces that display extreme resistance to wetting from a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as decane and octane.
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            Candle soot as a template for a transparent robust superamphiphobic coating.

            Coating is an essential step in adjusting the surface properties of materials. Superhydrophobic coatings with contact angles greater than 150° and roll-off angles below 10° for water have been developed, based on low-energy surfaces and roughness on the nano- and micrometer scales. However, these surfaces are still wetted by organic liquids such as surfactant-based solutions, alcohols, or alkanes. Coatings that are simultaneously superhydrophobic and superoleophobic are rare. We designed an easily fabricated, transparent, and oil-rebounding superamphiphobic coating. A porous deposit of candle soot was coated with a 25-nanometer-thick silica shell. The black coating became transparent after calcination at 600°C. After silanization, the coating was superamphiphobic and remained so even after its top layer was damaged by sand impingement.
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              Super-Water-Repellent Fractal Surfaces

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science
                Science (New York, N.Y.)
                1095-9203
                0036-8075
                Mar 6 2015
                : 347
                : 6226
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ, UK.
                [2 ] Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, People's Republic of China.
                [3 ] Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.
                [4 ] Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ, UK. i.p.parkin@ucl.ac.uk.
                Article
                347/6226/1132
                10.1126/science.aaa0946
                25745169
                56b039ff-5c71-43f4-b83c-4c89e3bc5563
                Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
                History

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