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      Some of My Best Friends——Experiences of Bullying Within Friendships

      , ,
      School Psychology International
      SAGE Publications

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          Most cited references35

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          Bullying Behaviors Among US Youth

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            The company they keep: friendships and their developmental significance.

            Considerable evidence tells us that ¿being liked¿ and ¿being disliked¿ are related to social competence, but evidence concerning friendships and their developmental significance is relatively weak. The argument is advanced that the developmental implications of these relationships cannot be specified without distinguishing between having friends, the identity of one's friends, and friendship quality. Most commonly, children are differentiated from one another in diagnosis and research only according to whether or not they have friends. The evidence shows that friends provide one another with cognitive and social scaffolding that differs from what nonfriends provide, and having friends supports good outcomes across normative transitions. But predicting developmental outcome also requires knowing about the behavioral characteristics and attitudes of children's friends as well as qualitative features of these relationships.
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              Overt and relational aggression in adolescents: social-psychological adjustment of aggressors and victims.

              Examined the relative and combined associations among relational and overt forms of aggression and victimization and adolescents' concurrent depression symptoms, loneliness, self-esteem, and externalizing behavior. An ethnically diverse sample of 566 adolescents (55% girls) in Grades 9 to 12 participated. Results replicated prior work on relational aggression and victimization as distinct forms of peer behavior that are uniquely associated with concurrent social-psychological adjustment. Victimization was associated most closely with internalizing symptoms, and peer aggression was related to symptoms of disruptive behavior disorder. Findings also supported the hypothesis that victims of multiple forms of aggression are at greater risk for adjustment difficulties than victims of one or no form of aggression. Social support from close friends appeared to buffer the effects of victimization on adjustment.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                School Psychology International
                School Psychology International
                SAGE Publications
                0143-0343
                1461-7374
                December 2008
                December 2008
                : 29
                : 5
                : 549-573
                Article
                10.1177/0143034308099201
                57065744-a531-48bd-ac15-a7a7b4048d35
                © 2008

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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